2015 Pension Plan Limitations

The Internal Revenue Service today announced cost‑of‑living adjustments affecting dollar limitations for pension plans and other retirement-related items for tax year 2015. Many of the pension plan limitations will change for 2015 because the increase in the cost-of-living index met the statutory thresholds that trigger their adjustment. However, other limitations will remain unchanged because the increase in the index did not meet the statutory thresholds that trigger their adjustment. Highlights include the following:

  • The elective deferral (contribution) limit for employees who participate in 401(k), 403(b), most 457 plans, and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan is increased from $17,500 to $18,000.
  • The catch-up contribution limit for employees aged 50 and over who participate in 401(k), 403(b), most 457 plans, and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan is increased from $5,500 to $6,000.
  • The limit on annual contributions to an Individual Retirement Arrangement (IRA) remains unchanged at $5,500. The additional catch-up contribution limit for individuals aged 50 and over is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $1,000.
  • The deduction for taxpayers making contributions to a traditional IRA is phased out for singles and heads of household who are covered by a workplace retirement plan and have modified adjusted gross incomes (AGI) between $61,000 and $71,000, up from $60,000 and $70,000 in 2014. For married couples filing jointly, in which the spouse who makes the IRA contribution is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the income phase-out range is $98,000 to $118,000, up from $96,000 to $116,000. For an IRA contributor who is not covered by a workplace retirement plan and is married to someone who is covered, the deduction is phased out if the couple’s income is between $183,000 and $193,000, up from $181,000 and $191,000. For a married individual filing a separate return who is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $0 to $10,000.
  • The AGI phase-out range for taxpayers making contributions to a Roth IRA is $183,000 to $193,000 for married couples filing jointly, up from $181,000 to $191,000 in 2014. For singles and heads of household, the income phase-out range is $116,000 to $131,000, up from $114,000 to $129,000. For a married individual filing a separate return, the phase-out range is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $0 to $10,000.
  • The AGI limit for the saver’s credit (also known as the retirement savings contribution credit) for low- and moderate-income workers is $61,000 for married couples filing jointly, up from $60,000 in 2014; $45,750 for heads of household, up from $45,000; and $30,500 for married individuals filing separately and for singles, up from $30,000.

Below are details on both the adjusted and unchanged limitations.

Section 415 of the Internal Revenue Code provides for dollar limitations on benefits and contributions under qualified retirement plans. Section 415(d) requires that the Secretary of the Treasury annually adjust these limits for cost‑of‑living increases. Other limitations applicable to deferred compensation plans are also affected by these adjustments under Section 415. Under Section 415(d), the adjustments are to be made under adjustment procedures similar to those used to adjust benefit amounts under Section 215(i)(2)(A) of the Social Security Act.

Effective Jan. 1, 2015, the limitation on the annual benefit under a defined benefit plan under Section 415(b)(1)(A) remains unchanged at $210,000. For a participant who separated from service before January 1, 2015, the limitation for defined benefit plans under Section 415(b)(1)(B) is computed by multiplying the participant’s compensation limitation, as adjusted through 2014, by 1.0178.

The limitation for defined contribution plans under Section 415(c)(1)(A) is increased in 2015 from $52,000 to $53,000.

The Code provides that various other dollar amounts are to be adjusted at the same time and in the same manner as the dollar limitation of Section 415(b)(1)(A). After taking into account the applicable rounding rules, the amounts for 2015 are as follows:

The limitation under Section 402(g)(1) on the exclusion for elective deferrals described in Section 402(g)(3) is increased from $17,500 to $18,000.

The annual compensation limit under Sections 401(a)(17), 404(l), 408(k)(3)(C) and 408(k)(6)(D)(ii) is increased from $260,000 to $265,000.

The dollar limitation under Section 416(i)(1)(A)(i) concerning the definition of key employee in a top-heavy plan remains unchanged at $170,000.

The dollar amount under Section 409(o)(1)(C)(ii) for determining the maximum account balance in an employee stock ownership plan subject to a 5‑year distribution period is increased from $1,050,000 to $1,070,000, while the dollar amount used to determine the lengthening of the 5‑year distribution period remains unchanged at $210,000.

The limitation used in the definition of highly compensated employee under Section 414(q)(1)(B) is increased from $115,000 to $120,000.

The dollar limitation under Section 414(v)(2)(B)(i) for catch-up contributions to an applicable employer plan other than a plan described in Section 401(k)(11) or Section 408(p) for individuals aged 50 or over is increased from $5,500 to $6,000. The dollar limitation under Section 414(v)(2)(B)(ii) for catch-up contributions to an applicable employer plan described in Section 401(k)(11) or Section 408(p) for individuals aged 50 or over is increased from $2,500 to $3,000.

The annual compensation limitation under Section 401(a)(17) for eligible participants in certain governmental plans that, under the plan as in effect on July 1, 1993, allowed cost‑of‑living adjustments to the compensation limitation under the plan under Section 401(a)(17) to be taken into account, is increased from $385,000 to $395,000.

The compensation amount under Section 408(k)(2)(C) regarding simplified employee pensions (SEPs) is increased from $550 to $600.

The limitation under Section 408(p)(2)(E) regarding SIMPLE retirement accounts is increased from $12,000 to $12,500.

The limitation on deferrals under Section 457(e)(15) concerning deferred compensation plans of state and local governments and tax-exempt organizations is increased from $17,500 to $18,000.

The compensation amount under Section 1.61‑21(f)(5)(i) of the Income Tax Regulations concerning the definition of “control employee” for fringe benefit valuation remains unchanged at $105,000. The compensation amount under Section 1.61‑21(f)(5)(iii) is increased from $210,000 to $215,000.

The Code also provides that several retirement-related amounts are to be adjusted using the cost-of-living adjustment under Section 1(f)(3). After taking the applicable rounding rules into account, the amounts for 2015 are as follows:

The adjusted gross income limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(A) for determining the retirement savings contribution credit for married taxpayers filing a joint return is increased from $36,000 to $36,500; the limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(B) is increased from $39,000 to $39,500; and the limitation under Sections 25B(b)(1)(C) and 25B(b)(1)(D) is increased from $60,000 to $61,000.

The adjusted gross income limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(A) for determining the retirement savings contribution credit for taxpayers filing as head of household is increased from $27,000 to $27,375; the limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(B) is increased from $29,250 to $29,625; and the limitation under Sections 25B(b)(1)(C) and 25B(b)(1)(D) is increased from $45,000 to $45,750.

The adjusted gross income limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(A) for determining the retirement savings contribution credit for all other taxpayers is increased from $18,000 to $18,250; the limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(B) is increased from $19,500 to $19,750; and the limitation under Sections 25B(b)(1)(C) and 25B(b)(1)(D) is increased from $30,000 to $30,500.

The deductible amount under Section 219(b)(5)(A) for an individual making qualified retirement contributions remains unchanged at $5,500.

The applicable dollar amount under Section 219(g)(3)(B)(i) for determining the deductible amount of an IRA contribution for taxpayers who are active participants filing a joint return or as a qualifying widow(er) is increased from $96,000 to $98,000. The applicable dollar amount under Section 219(g)(3)(B)(ii) for all other taxpayers (other than married taxpayers filing separate returns) is increased from $60,000 to $61,000. The applicable dollar amount under Section 219(g)(3)(B)(iii) for a married individual filing a separate return is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $0. The applicable dollar amount under Section 219(g)(7)(A) for a taxpayer who is not an active participant but whose spouse is an active participant is increased from $181,000 to $183,000.

The adjusted gross income limitation under Section 408A(c)(3)(B)(ii)(I) for determining the maximum Roth IRA contribution for married taxpayers filing a joint return or for taxpayers filing as a qualifying widow(er) is increased from $181,000 to $183,000. The adjusted gross income limitation under Section 408A(c)(3)(B)(ii)(II) for all other taxpayers (other than married taxpayers filing separate returns) is increased from $114,000 to $116,000. The applicable dollar amount under Section 408A(c)(3)(B)(ii)(III) for a married individual filing a separate return is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $0.

The dollar amount under Section 430(c)(7)(D)(i)(II) used to determine excess employee compensation with respect to a single-employer defined benefit pension plan for which the special election under Section 430(c)(2)(D) has been made is increased from $1,084,000 to $1,101,000.

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Hawaii General Excise Tax (GET)

What is the fee for a GET license?

A one-time $20 fee.

How can I apply for a GET license?

The State of Hawaii Basic Business Application, BB-1 Packet, must be completed and submitted with the one-time $20 license fee. It is recommended that the application be mailed in; however, it can also be applied for in person at any of the district offices. The application form is available on the website.

Where do I mail the application for the GET license to?

General Excise License Applications
P.O. Box 1425
Honolulu, HI 96806-1425

Can I apply for a GET license online?

Yes, Hawaii Business Express is the quick and easy way to start a business in the state of Hawaii. One simple interface covers all the forms with all the state agencies and partners. For more information, please see the Hawaii Business Express website.

What are the due dates for filing periodic GET returns?

The due date for filing periodic returns (Monthly, Quarterly and Semi-annually) is the 20th day of the month following the close of the tax period. For example: Monthly filer, filing for the month of January, the due date is February 20th, Quarterly filer, filing for the period ending March, the due date is April 20th and a Semi-annual filer, filing for the period ending June, the due date is July 20th.

What is the due date for filing an annual GET return?

The due date is the 20th day of the fourth month following the close of the taxable year. For calendar year filers, the due date is April 20th of the following year.

What is Hawaii’s sales tax rate?

Hawaii does not have a sales tax; instead, we have the GET, which is assessed on all business activities. The tax rate is .15% for Insurance Commission, .50% for Wholesaling, Manufacturing, Producing, Wholesale Services, and Use Tax on Imports For Resale, and 4% for all others. For differences between the GET and sales tax, please see Tax Facts 96-1, General Excise vs. Sales Tax.

If your business activity is taxed at the 4% rate and is conducting business on Oahu, you are also subject to the .50% Oahu County Surcharge Tax. For more information regarding the Oahu County Surcharge Tax, see County Surcharge – FAQ’s.

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Penalty Relief Pilot for Small Retirement Plans

IRS will begin a one-year pilot program in June to help small businesses with retirement plans that owe penalties for not filing reporting documents. By filing current and prior year forms during this pilot program, they can avoid penalties.

The IRS is reaching out to certain small businesses that maintain retirement plans and may have been unaware that they had a filing requirement. The IRS projects that this program will bring a significant number of small business owners into compliance with the reporting requirements.

Plan administrators and sponsors who do not file an annual Form 5500 series return can face stiff penalties — up to $15,000 per return. Those who have already been assessed a penalty for late filings are not eligible for this program. This program is open only to retirement plans generally maintained by certain small businesses, such as those in an owner-spouse arrangement or eligible partnership.

Multiple late retirement plan returns may be included in a single submission. If a retirement plan has delinquent returns for more than one plan year, penalty relief may be available for all of these returns. Similarly, delinquent returns for more than one plan may be included in a single penalty relief request. No filing fee will be charged during the pilot program.

Revenue Procedure 2014-32.

This revenue procedure establishes a temporary one-year pilot program providing administrative relief to plan administrators and plan sponsors of certain retirement plans from the penalties otherwise applicable under §§ 6652(e) and 6692 of the Internal Revenue Code (the “Code”) for a failure to timely comply with the annual reporting requirements imposed under §§ 6047(e), 6058, and 6059 of the Code. The administrative relief provided under this revenue procedure applies only to plan administrators (as defined in § 414(g) of the Code) and plan sponsors of retirement plans that are subject to the reporting requirements of §§ 6047(e), 6058, and 6059 of the Code, but that are not subject to the reporting requirements of Title I of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (“ERISA”). This revenue procedure also requests comments as to whether a permanent relief program should be established and, if so, how fees should be determined.

Both the Code and Title I of ERISA impose reporting requirements with respect to certain retirement plans. To minimize the filing burden on plan sponsors and plan administrators of employee benefit plans, the Internal Revenue Service (the “Service”) and the Department of Labor (the “DOL”) (as well as the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation) have consolidated various annual reporting requirements in the Form 5500 Series Annual Return/Report. The Form 5500 Series includes: the Form 5500, Annual Return/Report of Employee Benefit Plan; the Form 5500-SF, Short Form Annual Return/Report of Employee Benefit Plan; and the Form 5500-EZ, Annual Return of One-Participant (Owners and Their Spouses) Retirement Plan.
Plan sponsors and plan administrators who fail to file timely Form 5500 series annual returns/reports for their retirement plans may be subject to civil penalties under the Code (or under both Title I of ERISA and the Code). In particular, the Service may assess penalties under §§ 6652(e) and 6692 of the Code for the failure to satisfy the requirements for annual returns. Section 6652(e) generally provides, in part, that in the case of any failure to timely file a return or statement required under § 6058 (annual return of employee benefit plans) or § 6047(e) (returns and reports for employee stock ownership plans), the late filer shall pay, upon notice and demand, a penalty of $25 for each day the failure continues, up to $15,000 per return or statement. Section 6692 generally provides that, in the case of any failure to timely file a report required by § 6059 (actuarial report for employee benefit plans), the late filer shall pay a penalty of $1,000 for each failure. No penalty is imposed under these sections if it is shown that such failure to timely file is due to reasonable cause.

In 1995, the DOL established the Delinquent Filer Voluntary Compliance (“DFVC”) program to reduce ERISA late-filing penalties on filers of delinquent annual reports. In Notice 2002-23, 2002-1 C.B. 742, the Service determined that it would not impose the penalties under §§ 6652(c)(1), (d), (e) and 6692 (to the extent applicable) on a person who is eligible for, and satisfies the requirements of, the DFVC program with respect to the filing of a Form 5500. The relief under Notice 2002-23 was available only to filers who are required to file under both Title I of ERISA and the Code. Notice 2002-23 has been superseded by Notice 2014-35, which will appear in 2014-23 I.R.B. As under Notice 2002-23, the penalty relief provided by Notice 2014-35 does not apply to a delinquent filing of a Form 5500-EZ for retirement plans that do not cover any common law employees (such as a plan under which a business owner and the owner’s spouse are the only participants). See 29 C.F.R. 2510.3-3(b) and (c).
Certain retirement plans that are not subject to Title I of ERISA are exempt from some of the annual reporting requirements if they satisfy certain criteria specified by statute or by the Service in published guidance. For example, for years beginning after 2006, section 1103 of the Pension Protection Act of 2006 (Pub. L. No. 109-280, 120 Stat. 780, 1057) provides that “one-participant plans” with assets of $250,000 or less at the end of the plan year are not required to file a Form 5500 series return/report. (The Service has determined that such plans must, however, file an annual return/report when the plan is terminated and all assets have been distributed.)

Penalty Relief

The relief applies to filers who are eligible to participate under Section 4 of this revenue procedure and who satisfy the requirements of Section 5 of this revenue procedure by no later than June 2, 2015. However, in lieu of the relief provided under this revenue procedure, filers may continue to file for the relief currently available for a failure to timely file that is due to reasonable cause.

 

3.8% Net Investment Income Tax

The Net Investment Income Tax is imposed by section 1411 of the Internal Revenue Code. The NIIT applies at a rate of 3.8% to certain net investment income of individuals, estates and trusts that have income above the statutory threshold amounts.

In general, investment income includes, but is not limited to: interest, dividends, capital gains, rental and royalty income, non-qualified annuities, income from businesses involved in trading of financial instruments or commodities and businesses that are passive activities to the taxpayer (within the meaning of section 469). To calculate your Net Investment Income, your investment income is reduced by certain expenses properly allocable to the income.

To the extent that gains are not otherwise offset by capital losses, the following gains are common examples of items taken into account in computing Net Investment Income:

  1. Gains from the sale of stocks, bonds, and mutual funds.
  2. Capital gain distributions from mutual funds.
  3. Gain from the sale of investment real estate (including gain from the sale of a second home that is not a primary residence).
  4. Gains from the sale of interests in partnerships and S corporations (to the extent the partner or shareholder was a passive owner)

The Net Investment Income Tax does not apply to any amount of gain that is excluded from gross income for regular income tax purposes. The pre-existing statutory exclusion in section 121 exempts the first $250,000 ($500,000 in the case of a married couple) of gain recognized on the sale of a principal residence from gross income for regular income tax purposes and, thus, from the NIIT.

Example 1: A, a single filer, earns $210,000 in wages and sells his principal residence that he has owned and resided in for the last 10 years for $420,000. A’s cost basis in the home is $200,000. A’s realized gain on the sale is $220,000. Under section 121, A may exclude up to $250,000 of gain on the sale. Because this gain is excluded for regular income tax purposes, it is also excluded for purposes of determining Net Investment Income. In this example, the Net Investment Income Tax does not apply to the gain from the sale of A’s home.

Example 2: B and C, a married couple filing jointly, sell their principal residence that they have owned and resided in for the last 10 years for $1.3 million. B and C’s cost basis in the home is $700,000. B and C’s realized gain on the sale is $600,000. The recognized gain subject to regular income taxes is $100,000 ($600,000 realized gain less the $500,000 section 121 exclusion). B and C have $125,000 of other Net Investment Income, which brings B and C’s total Net Investment Income to $225,000. B and C’s modified adjusted gross income is $300,000 and exceeds the threshold amount of $250,000 by $50,000. B and C are subject to NIIT on the lesser of $225,000 (B’s Net Investment Income) or $50,000 (the amount B and C’s modified adjusted gross income exceeds the $250,000 married filing jointly threshold). B and C owe Net Investment Income Tax of $1,900 ($50,000 X 3.8%).

Example 3: D, a single filer, earns $45,000 in wages and sells her principal residence that she has owned and resided in for the last 10 years for $1 million. D’s cost basis in the home is $600,000. D’s realized gain on the sale is $400,000. The recognized gain subject to regular income taxes is $150,000 ($400,000 realized gain less the $250,000 section 121 exclusion), which is also Net Investment Income. D’s modified adjusted gross income is $195,000. Since D’s modified adjusted gross income is below the threshold amount of $200,000, D does not owe any Net Investment Income Tax.

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Seattle Minimum Wage Raise – Beginning April 1, 2015

Seattle City Council unanimously approved the adoption of a $15 per hour minimum wage. Beginning April 1, 2015, the legislation will phase-in a $15 per hour minimum wage annually over 3 to 7 years, depending on employer size.

Twenty-four percent of Seattle workers earn hourly wages of $15 per hour or less, and approximately 13.6 percent of the Seattle community lives below the federal poverty level, according to a University of Washington study. Washington State’s minimum wage is currently $9.32 per hour. Effective April 1, 2015, the minimum wage in Seattle will be $10.00 or $11.00 per hour depending on employer size. Here is a chart illustrating the subsequent annual minimum wage increase based on employer size.

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Signed Ordinance and the  Resolution that were approved by City Council on June 2, 2014.

 

IRS Interest Rates for the First Quarter of 2014

IRS Interest Rate for the calendar quarter beginning Jan. 1, 2014

  • three (3) percent for overpayments [two (2) percent in the case of a corporation];
  • three (3) percent for underpayments;
  • five (5) percent for large corporate underpayments; and
  • one-half (0.5) percent for the portion of a corporate overpayment exceeding $10,000.

Under the Internal Revenue Code, the rate of interest is determined on a quarterly basis.  For taxpayers other than corporations, the overpayment and underpayment rate is the federal short-term rate plus 3 percentage points.

Generally, in the case of a corporation, the underpayment rate is the federal short-term rate plus 3 percentage points and the overpayment rate is the federal short-term rate plus 2 percentage points. The rate for large corporate underpayments is the federal short-term rate plus 5 percentage points. The rate on the portion of a corporate overpayment of tax exceeding $10,000 for a taxable period is the federal short-term rate plus one-half (0.5) of a percentage point.

Revenue Ruling 2013-25

 

IRS Failure to File or Failure to Pay Penalties

When it comes to filing your tax return, the law provides that the IRS can assess a penalty if you fail to file, fail to pay or both.

Here are eight important points about the two different penalties you may face if you file or pay late.

  1. If you do not file by the deadline, you might face a failure-to-file penalty. If you do not pay by the due date, you could face a failure-to-pay penalty.
  2. The failure-to-file penalty is generally more than the failure-to-pay penalty. So if you cannot pay all the taxes you owe, you should still file your tax return on time and pay as much as you can, then explore other payment options. The IRS will work with you.
  3. The penalty for filing late is usually 5 percent of the unpaid taxes for each month or part of a month that a return is late. This penalty will not exceed 25 percent of your unpaid taxes.
  4. If you file your return more than 60 days after the due date or extended due date, the minimum penalty is the smaller of $135 or 100 percent of the unpaid tax.
  5. If you do not pay your taxes by the due date, you will generally have to pay a failure-to-pay penalty of ½ of 1 percent of your unpaid taxes for each month or part of a month after the due date that the taxes are not paid. This penalty can be as much as 25 percent of your unpaid taxes.
  6. If you request an extension of time to file by the tax deadline and you paid at least 90 percent of your actual tax liability by the original due date, you will not face a failure-to-pay penalty if the remaining balance is paid by the extended due date.
  7. If both the failure-to-file penalty and the failure-to-pay penalty apply in any month, the 5 percent failure-to-file penalty is reduced by the failure-to-pay penalty. However, if you file your return more than 60 days after the due date or extended due date, the minimum penalty is the smaller of $135 or 100 percent of the unpaid tax.
  8. You will not have to pay a failure-to-file or failure-to-pay penalty if you can show that you failed to file or pay on time because of reasonable cause and not because of willful neglect.

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Software for Combining csv Files

 

This program allows merging two databases in csv format via common nominator.

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CSV Combinator is a windows desktop application.

CSV Combining Service

Do you need someone to help you combine two csv files  by some common ID?

Both files must share column with common value (key or ID).

Example:

You would like to cobine list of customers (buyers)  that contains e-mail addresses and order numbers with database with e-mail addresses and mail addresses (street, city, state). Common key in this case is e-mail address.  After combining, you will have new database of your customers with postal addresses and you will be able to send them offer by ordinary mail.

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2013 Individual Federal Income Tax Return Changes

Standard mileage rates. The 2013 rate for business use of your car is increased to 56½ cents a mile. The 2013 rate for use of your car to get medical care is increased to 24 cents a mile. The 2013 rate for use of your car to move is increased to 24 cents a mile.

Change in tax rates. The highest tax rate is 39.6%.

Net Investment Income Tax. Beginning in 2013, you may be subject to Net Investment Income Tax (NIIT). The NIIT is 3.8% of the smaller of (a) your net investment income or (b) the excess of your modified adjusted gross income over:

  • $125,000 if married filing separately,
  • $250,000 if married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er), or
  • $200,000 if any other filing status.

Tax rate on net capital gain and qualified dividends. The maximum tax rate of 15% on net capital gain and qualified dividends has increased to 20% for some taxpayers.

Medical and dental expenses. You can deduct only the part of your medical and dental expenses that is more than 10% of your adjusted gross income (7.5% if either you or your spouse is age 65 or older).

Personal exemption amount increased for certain taxpayers. Your personal exemption is increased to $3,900. But the amount is reduced if your adjusted gross income is more than:

  • $150,000 if married filing separately,
  • $250,000 if single,
  • $275,000 if head of household, or
  • $300,000 if any other filing status.

Limit on itemized deductions. You may not be able to deduct all of your itemized deductions if your adjusted gross income is more than:

  • $150,000 if married filing separately,
  • $250,000 if single,
  • $275,000 if head of household, or
  • $300,000 if any other filing status.

Same-sex marriages. If you have a same-sex spouse whom you legally married in a state (or foreign country) that recognizes same-sex marriage, you and your spouse generally must use the married filing jointly or married filing separately filing status on your 2013 return, even if you and your spouse now live in a state (or foreign country) that does not recognize same-sex marriage.

Health flexible spending arrangements (FSAs). You cannot have more than $2,500 in salary reduction contributions made to a health FSA for plan years beginning after 2012.

Expiring credits. The plug-in electric vehicle credit and the refundable part of the credit for prior year minimum tax have expired. You cannot claim either one on your 2013 return.

Pnzi-type investment schemes. There are new rules for how to claim a theft loss deduction on Form 4684 due to a Ponzi-type investment scheme.

Home office deduction simplified method. If you can take a home office deduction, you may be able to use a simplified method to figure it. See Publication 587.

Additional Medicare Tax. Beginning in 2013, a 0.9% Additional Medicare Tax applies to Medicare wages, railroad retirement (RRTA) compensation, and self-employment income that are more than:

  • $125,000 if married filing separately,
  • $250,000 if married filing jointly, or
  • $200,000 for any other filing status.

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