2013 Individual Federal Income Tax Return Changes

Standard mileage rates. The 2013 rate for business use of your car is increased to 56½ cents a mile. The 2013 rate for use of your car to get medical care is increased to 24 cents a mile. The 2013 rate for use of your car to move is increased to 24 cents a mile.

Change in tax rates. The highest tax rate is 39.6%.

Net Investment Income Tax. Beginning in 2013, you may be subject to Net Investment Income Tax (NIIT). The NIIT is 3.8% of the smaller of (a) your net investment income or (b) the excess of your modified adjusted gross income over:

  • $125,000 if married filing separately,
  • $250,000 if married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er), or
  • $200,000 if any other filing status.

Tax rate on net capital gain and qualified dividends. The maximum tax rate of 15% on net capital gain and qualified dividends has increased to 20% for some taxpayers.

Medical and dental expenses. You can deduct only the part of your medical and dental expenses that is more than 10% of your adjusted gross income (7.5% if either you or your spouse is age 65 or older).

Personal exemption amount increased for certain taxpayers. Your personal exemption is increased to $3,900. But the amount is reduced if your adjusted gross income is more than:

  • $150,000 if married filing separately,
  • $250,000 if single,
  • $275,000 if head of household, or
  • $300,000 if any other filing status.

Limit on itemized deductions. You may not be able to deduct all of your itemized deductions if your adjusted gross income is more than:

  • $150,000 if married filing separately,
  • $250,000 if single,
  • $275,000 if head of household, or
  • $300,000 if any other filing status.

Same-sex marriages. If you have a same-sex spouse whom you legally married in a state (or foreign country) that recognizes same-sex marriage, you and your spouse generally must use the married filing jointly or married filing separately filing status on your 2013 return, even if you and your spouse now live in a state (or foreign country) that does not recognize same-sex marriage.

Health flexible spending arrangements (FSAs). You cannot have more than $2,500 in salary reduction contributions made to a health FSA for plan years beginning after 2012.

Expiring credits. The plug-in electric vehicle credit and the refundable part of the credit for prior year minimum tax have expired. You cannot claim either one on your 2013 return.

Pnzi-type investment schemes. There are new rules for how to claim a theft loss deduction on Form 4684 due to a Ponzi-type investment scheme.

Home office deduction simplified method. If you can take a home office deduction, you may be able to use a simplified method to figure it. See Publication 587.

Additional Medicare Tax. Beginning in 2013, a 0.9% Additional Medicare Tax applies to Medicare wages, railroad retirement (RRTA) compensation, and self-employment income that are more than:

  • $125,000 if married filing separately,
  • $250,000 if married filing jointly, or
  • $200,000 for any other filing status.

More

Additional Medicare Tax

The Additional Medicare Tax is added by the Affordable Care Act (ACA). It applies to wages, railroad retirement (RRTA) compensation, and self-employment income over certain threshold amount received in taxable years beginning after Dec. 31, 2012. Employers are responsible for withholding the tax on wages and RRTA compensation in certain circumstances.

Tax rate is 0.9 percent.

An individual is liable for Additional Medicare Tax if the individual’s wages, compensation, or self-employment income (together with that of his or her spouse if filing a joint return) exceed the threshold amount for the individual’s filing status:

 

Filing Status

Threshold Amount

Married filing jointly $250,000
Married filing separate $125,000
Single $200,000
Head of household (with qualifying person) $200,000
Qualifying widow(er) with dependent child $200,000

Read more about Additional Medicare Tax

IRS final regulations (TD 9645)

IRS Form 8960 – Net Investment Income Tax

Form 8960 – Net Investment Income Tax— Individuals, Estates, and Trusts.  (Attachment to Form 1040 or Form 1041)

Individuals, estates, and trusts will use Form 8960 to compute their Net Investment Income Tax.

For individuals, the tax will be reported on, and paid with, the Form 1040. For estates and trusts, the tax will be reported on, and paid with, the Form 1041.

The Net Investment Income Tax is imposed by section 1411 of the Internal Revenue Code. The NIIT applies at a rate of 3.8% to certain net investment income of individuals, estates and trusts that have income above the statutory threshold amounts.

The Net Investment Income Tax went into effect on Jan. 1, 2013. The NIIT affects income tax returns of individuals, estates and trusts, beginning with their first tax year beginning on (or after) Jan. 1, 2013. It does not affect income tax returns for the 2012 taxable year filed in 2013.

Calculating the Net Investment Income Tax for individuals is a four-step process.

  1. Calculate by how much modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) exceeds the relevant threshold.
  2. Calculate net investment income for the year.
  3. Take the lesser of the amounts in step 1 or in step 2.
  4. Multiply the amount in step 3 by 3.8% (the net investment income tax rate).

Individuals will owe the tax if they have Net Investment Income and also have modified adjusted gross income over the following thresholds:

Filing Status

Threshold Amount

Married filing jointly

$250,000

Married filing separately

$125,000

Single

$200,000

Head of household (with qualifying person)

$200,000

Qualifying widow(er) with dependent child

$250,000

Taxpayers should be aware that these threshold amounts are not indexed for inflation.

If you are an individual who is exempt from Medicare taxes, you still may be subject to the Net Investment Income Tax if you have Net Investment Income and also have modified adjusted gross income over the applicable thresholds.

Read more

US Tax Court Decision – Shea Homes, Inc.

SHEA HOMES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES, ET AL.,1 Petitioners v.
COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE, Respondent

Docket Nos. 29271-09, 1400-10,

Filed February 12, 2014.

Full text of court decision:

Shea Homes, Inc – U.S. Tax Court Decision full text in .pdf

Conclusion:
SHI, SHLP, and Vistancia are permitted to report income and loss from the
sales of homes in their planned developments using the completed contract
method of accounting as consistent with this Opinion.24

Maryland Individual Income Tax Forms 2013

For tax year 2013, Maryland’s personal tax rates begin at 2% on the first $1000 of taxable income and increase up to a maximum of 5.75% on incomes exceeding $250,000 (or $300,000 for taxpayers filing jointly, heads of household, or qualifying widow(ers)). Nonresidents are subject to a special tax rate of 1.25%, in addition to the state income tax rate.

Maryland’s 23 counties and Baltimore City also levy a local income tax, which is collected on the resident state tax return as a convenience to local governments.

There are special tax benefits available to taxpayers 65 and older, military retirees, low income families and families paying for child care. The deadline for filing your Maryland income tax is April 15, 2014, if you are filing on a calendar year basis.

Resident Individuals Income Tax Forms
Number Title Description
502&502B Maryland Resident Income Tax Return with Form 502B Maryland long form for full- or part-year residents claiming dependents.
502 Maryland Resident Income Tax Return Maryland long form for full- or part-year residents.
502B Maryland Dependents Information Form to be used when claiming dependents.
502AC Maryland Subtraction for Contribution of Artwork Form and instructions for claiming subtraction for artwork created by qualifying persons and donated to a Maryland museum.
502AE Maryland Subtraction for Income Derived within an Arts and Entertainment District Form and instructions for claiming subtraction for income that a qualifying resident artist derives from selling an artistic work within an arts and entertainment district.
502CR Maryland Personal Income Tax Credits for Individuals and Instructions Form and instructions for individuals claiming personal income tax credits including:

  • Taxes paid to other states
  • Child and dependent care expenses
  • Long-term care insurance
  • Preservation and conservation easements
  • Neighborhood stabilization
  • IRC section 1341 repayment
  • Federal form 1041 Sch K-1 nonresident PTE tax
502D – 2013 Maryland Personal Declaration of Estimated Income Tax Form and instructions for filing and paying an estimated tax on income for tax year 2013 from which no tax is withheld, or wages from which not enough Maryland tax is withheld.
502D – 2014 Maryland Personal Declaration of Estimated Income Tax Form and instructions for filing and paying an estimated tax on income for tax year 2014 from which no tax is withheld, or wages from which not enough Maryland tax is withheld.
502E Maryland Application for Extension of Time to File Personal Income Tax Return Form and instructions for applying for a six-month income tax filing extension by April 15, 2014, (or the 15th day of the fourth month following the close of the tax year) and paying the full amount due with the application.
502INJ Injured Spouse Claim Form Form and instructions for a qualifying spouse to a file claim for a portion of a refund issued to the other spouse if any of the refund was applied to the following debts owed by the other spouse: past due state or federal taxes, past due child support or other state debt that has been referred to the Central Collection Unit.
502S Maryland Sustainable Communities Tax Credit 502S is used to calculate allowable tax credits for the rehabilitation of certified rehabilitation structures completed in the tax year which begins during the period of January 1, 2012 through December 31, 2012. Form 502S only applies to applications received by Maryland Historical Trust on or after June 1, 2010. For applications received by Maryland Historical Trust before June 1, 2010, use Form 502H.
502SU Maryland Subtractions from Income Other subtractions that you may qualify for will be reported on Form 502SU. Determine which subtractions apply to you and enter the amount for each on Form 502SU and attach to your Form 502.
502TP Computation of Tax Preference Income Modification Form and instructions for an individual or fiduciary of an estate or trust to use for reporting items of tax preference in excess of $10,000 ($20,000 for a joint return).
502UP Underpayment of Estimated Maryland Income Tax by Individuals Form and instructions for individuals who are liable for interest for untimely filing and/or underpayment of their estimated tax.
502V Use of Vehicle for Charitable Purposes Form and instructions for subtracting from the federal adjusted gross income certain unreimbursed automobile travel expenses incurred in connection with service as a volunteer for a nonprofit volunteer fire company or other qualified organization.
502X Maryland Amended Tax Form and Instructions Form and instructions to be used by resident individuals for amending any item of a Maryland return for tax year 2013.
503 Maryland Resident Income Tax Return (Short Form) Maryland short form for full year residents with incomes of less than $100,000.
588 Direct Deposit of Maryland Income Tax Refund to More Than One Account Use Form 588 if you want us to directly deposit your tax refund to either two or three of your accounts at a bank or other financial institution in the United States.
Nonresident Individuals Income Tax Forms
Number Title Description
505 Maryland Nonresident Income Tax Return Form for nonresidents to file if:

  • they are required to file a federal return based on the minimum filing requirements, and
  • they received income from sources in Maryland

Note: This form is not required for nonresidents who reside in the District of Columbia, Pennsylvania, Virginia or West Virginia and had only wages from Maryland.

505NR Nonresident Income Tax Computation Form for nonresidents to use to compute their Maryland taxable net income with subtractions for non-Maryland income, and attach to Form 505.
505SU Nonresident Subtractions Form to be used by nonresidents for any qualified Maryland subtractions.
505X Maryland Nonresident Amended Tax Return Form and instructions for nonresidents to use to complete a nonresident amended return for tax year 2013.

Note: Nonresidents who wish to amend a tax year prior to 2009 must complete Form 502X for the year to be amended.

515 Maryland Tax Return – Nonresident Local Tax Form and instructions for nonresidents employed in Maryland who reside in jurisdictions that impose a local income or earnings tax on Maryland residents.
Instruction Booklets
Booklet Title Description
Resident Maryland State and Local Tax Forms and Instructions Instructions for filing personal state and local income taxes for full- or part-year Maryland residents.
Resident Itemized Deduction Worksheet Maryland State and Local Resident Itemized Deduction Worksheet Worksheet for all resident taxpayers who itemize deductions and who had federal Adjusted Gross Income of $178,150 or more ($89,075 if Married Filing Separately). This worksheet is needed to address limitations affecting itemized deductions.
Nonresident Maryland Tax Forms for Nonresidents Instructions for filing personal income tax returns for nonresident individuals.
Nonresident Itemized Deduction Worksheet Maryland Nonresident Itemized Deduction Worksheet Worksheet for all nonresident taxpayers who itemize deductions and who had federal Adjusted Gross Income of $178,150 or more ($89,075 if Married Filing Separately). This worksheet is needed to address limitations affecting itemized deductions.

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Filing Information for Individual Income Tax

Electronic Filing (iFile)
Paper Filing
Income Tax Forms 
Power of Attorney

IRS Employment Tax Reporting and Deposit Due Dates in 2014

 

Reporting Due Dates

 

Generally, employers must report wages, tips and other compensation paid to an employee by filing the required form(s) to the IRS. You must also report on the taxes you deposit.

 

By January 31

 

 

By February 28

 

 

By March 31

 

File electronic Forms 1099 and 8027 with the IRS. File electronic Forms W-2 with the SSA. For information on reporting Form W-2 information to the SSA electronically, visit the Social Security Administration’s Employer W-3 Filing Instructions & Information web page. We have two publications about filing information returns electronically.

 

  • Publication 1220 (PDF), Specifications for Filing Forms 1097, 1098, 1099, 3921, 3922, 5498, 8935, and W-2G Electronically
  • Publication 1239 (PDF), Specifications for Filing Form 8027

 

By April 30, July 31, October 31, and January 31

 

 

Deposit Due Dates

 

In general, you must deposit federal income tax withheld and both the employer and employee social security and Medicare taxes.

 

There are two deposit schedules, monthly and semi-weekly. Before the beginning of each calendar year, you must determine which of the two deposit schedules you are required to use. The deposit schedule you must use is based on the total tax liability you reported on Form 941 during a lookback period. See special rules for Forms 944 and 945. Schedules for depositing and reporting taxes are not the same.

 

You must use electronic funds transfer (EFTPS) to make all federal tax deposits.

 

Monthly Depositor

 

Under the monthly deposit schedule, deposit employment taxes on payments made during a month by the 15th day of the following month. Employers who deposit monthly should only report their deposits quarterly or annually by filing Form 941 or Form 944.

 

Semi-weekly Depositor

 

Under the semiweekly deposit schedule, deposit employment taxes for payments made on Wednesday, Thursday, and/or Friday by the following Wednesday. Deposit taxes for payments made on Saturday, Sunday, Monday, and/or Tuesday by the following Friday. Report your deposits quarterly or annually only by filing Form 941 or Form 944.

 

FUTA Deposits

 

Deposit FUTA tax by the last day of the first month that follows the end of the quarter. If the due date for making your deposit falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday, you may make your deposit on the next business day.

 

If your liability for the fourth quarter (plus any undeposited amount from any earlier quarter) is over $500, deposit the entire amount by the due date of Form 940 (January 31). If it is $500 or less, you can make a deposit, pay the tax with a credit or debit card, or pay the tax with your 2011 Form 940 by January 31.

Source

EITC

All Workers Claiming the EITC Must:

  • Have a valid Social Security number,
  • Not file as “married filing separate,”
  • Not file Form 2555 or Form 2555-EZ (related to Foreign Earned Income),
  • Meet the investment income limitation ($3,200 or less for tax year 2012),
  • Have earned income,
  • Not be the qualifying child of another person,
  • Generally, be a U.S. citizen or resident alien for the entire year.

 

To Claim EITC With a Qualifying Child, the Child Must Pass All of the Following Tests:

  • Relationship
    • A son or daughter (including an adopted child or child placed for adoption)
    • Stepchild
    • Foster child placed by an authorized placement agency or court
    • Brother, sister,  half brother, half sister, stepbrother, stepsister or a descendant of any of them
  • Age, at the end of the filing year, the child was:
    • Younger than the worker (or the worker’s spouse if married filing jointly) and 
      • younger than 19,
      • or, younger than 24 and a full-time student
    • Any age if permanently and totally disabled
  • Residency
    • Child must live with the worker, or the worker’s spouse if filing a joint return, in the United States* for more than half of the year.
  • Joint Return
    • The child can not have filed a joint return, unless the child and the child’s spouse did not have a filing requirement and filed only to claim a refund.

Note: For EITC, the qualifying child does not need to meet the support test under the Uniform Definition of a Child. See Understanding Who is a Qualifying Child.

 

Warning: Only one person can claim the same qualifying child for EITC and other tax benefits.  If more than one person claims the same child, IRS applies the tiebreaker rules. Read more about the tiebreaker rules here.

 

To Claim EITC Without a Qualifying Child, You, and Your Spouse if you File a Joint Return:

  • Must have lived in the United States for more than half of the tax year,
  • Either you (or your spouse if filing a joint return) must be at least age 25 but less than age 65
  • Cannot qualify as the dependent of another person.

 

*Special rules apply for members of the Military on extended duty outside the United States.  See the Military section on the Special Rules for EITC page on irs.gov  for more information.

Tie Breaker Rules

Only one person can use the same qualifying child. If a child is the qualifying child of more than one person, only one person can claim the child as a qualifying child for all of the following tax benefits:

  • EITC
  • Dependency Exemption for the Child,
  • Child tax credit,
  • Head of household filing status,
  • Credit for child and dependent care expenses, and
  • Exclusion for dependent care benefits.

 

The other person(s) cannot take any of the six tax benefits listed above unless he or she has a different qualifying child.* If they cannot agree on who claims the child as a qualifying child, and more than one person claims tax benefits using the same child, the tiebreaker rule explained below applies.  If the other person is a spouse and they file a joint return, this rules does not apply.

Under the Tiebreaker Rule, the Child is Treated as a Qualifying Child Only By:

  •  The parents, if they file a joint return;.
  • The parent, if only one of the persons is the child’s  parent;
  • The parent with whom the child lived the longest during the tax year, if two of the persons are the child’s parent and they do not file a joint return together;
  • The parent with the highest adjusted gross income (AGI) if the child lived with each parent for the same amount of time during the tax years, and they do not file a joint return together;
  • The person with the highest AGI, if no parent can claim the child as a qualifying child; or
  • A person with the higher AGI than any parent who can claim the child as a qualifying child but does not.

Source

Georgia 2013 Individual Tax Return Forms and Instructions

 

2013 Individual Income Tax Forms 
Form IT- 511 Individual Income Tax Instruction Booklet IT- 511
Form 500 Individual Income Tax Return and IND-CR Individual Credit Form (Fill in on-line, print and mail) (rev. 7/13) 500
Form 500-EZ Short Individual Income Tax Return (Fill in on-line, print and mail) (rev. 7/13) 500-EZ
Form IND-CR Individual Income Tax Credit (rev. 7/13) IND-CR
Form IT-560 Individual / Fiduciary Extension Payment (Fill in on-line, print and mail) (rev. 7/13) IT-560
2013 Form 500-ES Estimated Tax for Individuals and Fiduciaries (Fill in on-line, print and mail) (rev. 9/12) 500-ES – 2013
2014 Form 500-ES Estimated Tax for Individuals and Fiduciaries (Fill in on-line, print and mail) (rev. 7/13) 500-ES – 2014
Form 525-TV Form 525-TV Payment Voucher (Fill in on-line, print and mail) (rev. 7/13) 525-TV
Form 500-NOL Application for Net Operating Loss Adjustment (other than corporations) (rev. 7/13) 500-NOL
Form 500X Amended Individual Income Tax Return (rev. 7/13) 500X
Form 2106 Employee Business Expenses (rev. 7/13) 2106
Form 4562 Depreciation and Amortization (rev. 7/13) 4562
Form 500-UET Underpayment of Estimated Tax by Individuals/ Fiduciary (rev. 10/12) 500-UET
Form GA-8453 Individual Income Tax Declaration for Electronic Filing or 2D Barcode Direct Deposit (rev. 8/13) GA-8453
Form IT-550 Claim for Refund of Georgia Income Tax Erroneously or Illegally Collected (rev. 8/13) IT-550
Form IT-303 Application for Extension of Time for Filing State Income Tax Returns (rev. 12/12) IT-303
Form GA-5347 Statement of Person Claiming Refund on Behalf of a Deceased Taxpayer (rev. 1/13) GA-5347
Form GA-9465 Installment Agreement Request Form (rev. 6/12) GA-9465
Replacement Check Request (rev. 5/12) Form IA-81
Full-year Residents
Full-year residents are taxed on all income, except tax exempt
income, regardless of the source or where derived. You are
required to file a Georgia income tax return if:
You are required to file a Federal income tax return;
You have income subject to Georgia income tax that is
not subject to Federal income tax;
Your income exceeds the standard deduction and
personal exemptions as indicated below:
Single, Head of Household or Qualifying Widow(er)
1. Under 65, not blind $5,000
2. Under 65, and blind 6,300
3. 65 or over, not blind 6,300
4. 65 or over, and blind 7,600
B. Married filing Joint
1. Both under 65, not blind $ 10,400
2. One 65 or over, not blind 11,700
3. Both under 65, both blind 13,000
4. Both under 65, one blind 11,700
5. Both 65 or over, not blind13,000
6. One 65 or over, and blind 13,000
7. One 65 or over, and both blind 14,300
8. Both 65 or over, and blind 15,600
C. Married filing Separate
1. Under 65, not blind $ 5,200
2. Under 65, and blind 6,500
3. 65 or over, not blind 6,500
4. 65 or over, and blind 7,800
These requirements apply as long as your legal residence is
Georgia, even if you are absent from or live outside the State temporarily. A credit for taxes paid to another state is allowe

2013 Federal Individual Tax Return Forms, Instructions and News

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Form 1040, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return

Annual income tax return filed by citizens or residents of the United States.

Instructions for Form 1040

Forms and Schedules for Form 1040

2013 news
Change in tax rates.
The highest tax rate for 2013 is 39.6%.
Tax rate on net capital gain and quali­fied dividends.
The maximum tax rate
of 15% on net capital gain and qualified
dividends has increased to 20% for some
taxpayers. The Qualified Dividends and
Capital Gain Tax Worksheet in the
line 44 instructions reflects this new,
higher rate.
Additional Medicare Tax.
Beginningin 2013, a 0.9% Additional Medicare
Tax applies to Medicare wages, railroad
retirement (RRTA) compensation, and
self-employment income that are more
than:
$125,000 if married filing separately,
$250,000 if married filing jointly,
or
$200,000 if single, head of household, or qualifying widow(er).

 

Net Investment Income Tax.
Beginning in 2013, you may be subject to Net
Investment Income Tax (NIIT). The
NIIT is 3.8% of the smaller of (a) your
net investment income or (b) the excess
of your modified adjusted gross income
over:
$125,000 if married filing separately,
$250,000 if married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er), or
$200,000 if single or head ofhousehold.

 

Filing status for same­sex marriedcouples.
If you have a same-sex spouse
whom you legally married in a state (or
foreign country) that recognizes
same-sex marriage, you and your spouse
generally must use the married filing
jointly or married filing separately filing
status on your 2013 return, even if you
and your spouse now live in a state (or
foreign country) that does not recognize
same-sex marriage.
Medical and dental expenses.
You candeduct only the part of your medical and
dental expenses that is more than 10%
of your adjusted gross income (7.5% if
either you or your spouse was born be-
fore January 2, 1949).
Personal exemption amount increased
for certain taxpayers.
Your personalexemption is increased to $3,900. But
the amount is reduced if your adjusted
gross income is more than:
$150,000 if married filing separately,
$250,000 if single,
$275,000 if head of household, or
$300,000 if married filing jointly
or qualifying widow(er).
Limit on itemized deductions.
Youmay not be able to deduct all of your
itemized deductions if your adjusted
gross income is more than:
$150,000 if married filing separately,
$250,000 if single,
$275,000 if head of household, or
$300,000 if married filing jointly
or qualifying widow(er).

 

Credit for prior year minimum tax.
The credit for prior year minimum tax is
no longer partly refundable.
Standard mileage rates.
The 2013 ratefor business use of your vehicle is in-
creased to 56 cents a mile. The 2013rate for use of your vehicle to get medical care or to move is increased to 24cents a mile.
Identity Protection Personal Identifi­
cation Number (IP PIN).
If you are filing electronically and both you and

your spouse received an IP PIN.

Updated IRS Smartphone App IRS2Go Version 4.0

IRS2Go on iTunes

IRS2Go on Google play

The redesigned IRS2Go provides new features for taxpayers to access the latest information to help them in the preparation of their tax returns. In this version, IRS2Go highlights the addition of an innovative new refund status tracker, providing taxpayers an easy-to-use feature to follow their tax return throughout the process.

The newest version of the free mobile app offers a number of safe and secure ways for taxpayers to access other popular tools and the most up-to-date tax information, including:

  • Refund Status. Taxpayers can check the status of their federal tax refund through IRS2Go. People simply enter their Social Security number, which will be masked and encrypted for security purposes, then select their filing status and enter the amount of their anticipated refund for their 2013 tax return. A new refund status tracker has been added so that taxpayers can follow their tax return throughout the process. Users can check their refund status 24 hours after the IRS acknowledges receipt of an e-filed retus the tool is updated just once a day, usually overnight, so there is no reason to check more than once a day.
  • Free Tax Prep Providers. The IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) and the Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Programs offer free tax help for taxpayers who qualify. This brand new tool on IRS2Go will help taxpayers find the nearest VITA site to their home by simply entering their zip code and selecting a mileage range. By clicking on the directions button within the results, the maps application on the device will load with the address, making it easy to navigate to your desired location.
  • Tax Records. Taxpayers can request their tax account or tax return transcript from IRS2Go. The transcript will be delivered via the U.S. Postal Service to their address of record.
  • Stay Connected. Taxpayers can interact with the IRS by following the IRS on Twitter, @IRSnews or @IRSenEspanol, watching helpful videos on YouTube, signing up for email updates or by using the Contact Us feature.