2013 Individual Federal Income Tax Return Changes

Standard mileage rates. The 2013 rate for business use of your car is increased to 56½ cents a mile. The 2013 rate for use of your car to get medical care is increased to 24 cents a mile. The 2013 rate for use of your car to move is increased to 24 cents a mile.

Change in tax rates. The highest tax rate is 39.6%.

Net Investment Income Tax. Beginning in 2013, you may be subject to Net Investment Income Tax (NIIT). The NIIT is 3.8% of the smaller of (a) your net investment income or (b) the excess of your modified adjusted gross income over:

  • $125,000 if married filing separately,
  • $250,000 if married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er), or
  • $200,000 if any other filing status.

Tax rate on net capital gain and qualified dividends. The maximum tax rate of 15% on net capital gain and qualified dividends has increased to 20% for some taxpayers.

Medical and dental expenses. You can deduct only the part of your medical and dental expenses that is more than 10% of your adjusted gross income (7.5% if either you or your spouse is age 65 or older).

Personal exemption amount increased for certain taxpayers. Your personal exemption is increased to $3,900. But the amount is reduced if your adjusted gross income is more than:

  • $150,000 if married filing separately,
  • $250,000 if single,
  • $275,000 if head of household, or
  • $300,000 if any other filing status.

Limit on itemized deductions. You may not be able to deduct all of your itemized deductions if your adjusted gross income is more than:

  • $150,000 if married filing separately,
  • $250,000 if single,
  • $275,000 if head of household, or
  • $300,000 if any other filing status.

Same-sex marriages. If you have a same-sex spouse whom you legally married in a state (or foreign country) that recognizes same-sex marriage, you and your spouse generally must use the married filing jointly or married filing separately filing status on your 2013 return, even if you and your spouse now live in a state (or foreign country) that does not recognize same-sex marriage.

Health flexible spending arrangements (FSAs). You cannot have more than $2,500 in salary reduction contributions made to a health FSA for plan years beginning after 2012.

Expiring credits. The plug-in electric vehicle credit and the refundable part of the credit for prior year minimum tax have expired. You cannot claim either one on your 2013 return.

Pnzi-type investment schemes. There are new rules for how to claim a theft loss deduction on Form 4684 due to a Ponzi-type investment scheme.

Home office deduction simplified method. If you can take a home office deduction, you may be able to use a simplified method to figure it. See Publication 587.

Additional Medicare Tax. Beginning in 2013, a 0.9% Additional Medicare Tax applies to Medicare wages, railroad retirement (RRTA) compensation, and self-employment income that are more than:

  • $125,000 if married filing separately,
  • $250,000 if married filing jointly, or
  • $200,000 for any other filing status.

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Georgia 2013 Individual Tax Return Forms and Instructions

 

2013 Individual Income Tax Forms 
Form IT- 511 Individual Income Tax Instruction Booklet IT- 511
Form 500 Individual Income Tax Return and IND-CR Individual Credit Form (Fill in on-line, print and mail) (rev. 7/13) 500
Form 500-EZ Short Individual Income Tax Return (Fill in on-line, print and mail) (rev. 7/13) 500-EZ
Form IND-CR Individual Income Tax Credit (rev. 7/13) IND-CR
Form IT-560 Individual / Fiduciary Extension Payment (Fill in on-line, print and mail) (rev. 7/13) IT-560
2013 Form 500-ES Estimated Tax for Individuals and Fiduciaries (Fill in on-line, print and mail) (rev. 9/12) 500-ES – 2013
2014 Form 500-ES Estimated Tax for Individuals and Fiduciaries (Fill in on-line, print and mail) (rev. 7/13) 500-ES – 2014
Form 525-TV Form 525-TV Payment Voucher (Fill in on-line, print and mail) (rev. 7/13) 525-TV
Form 500-NOL Application for Net Operating Loss Adjustment (other than corporations) (rev. 7/13) 500-NOL
Form 500X Amended Individual Income Tax Return (rev. 7/13) 500X
Form 2106 Employee Business Expenses (rev. 7/13) 2106
Form 4562 Depreciation and Amortization (rev. 7/13) 4562
Form 500-UET Underpayment of Estimated Tax by Individuals/ Fiduciary (rev. 10/12) 500-UET
Form GA-8453 Individual Income Tax Declaration for Electronic Filing or 2D Barcode Direct Deposit (rev. 8/13) GA-8453
Form IT-550 Claim for Refund of Georgia Income Tax Erroneously or Illegally Collected (rev. 8/13) IT-550
Form IT-303 Application for Extension of Time for Filing State Income Tax Returns (rev. 12/12) IT-303
Form GA-5347 Statement of Person Claiming Refund on Behalf of a Deceased Taxpayer (rev. 1/13) GA-5347
Form GA-9465 Installment Agreement Request Form (rev. 6/12) GA-9465
Replacement Check Request (rev. 5/12) Form IA-81
Full-year Residents
Full-year residents are taxed on all income, except tax exempt
income, regardless of the source or where derived. You are
required to file a Georgia income tax return if:
You are required to file a Federal income tax return;
You have income subject to Georgia income tax that is
not subject to Federal income tax;
Your income exceeds the standard deduction and
personal exemptions as indicated below:
Single, Head of Household or Qualifying Widow(er)
1. Under 65, not blind $5,000
2. Under 65, and blind 6,300
3. 65 or over, not blind 6,300
4. 65 or over, and blind 7,600
B. Married filing Joint
1. Both under 65, not blind $ 10,400
2. One 65 or over, not blind 11,700
3. Both under 65, both blind 13,000
4. Both under 65, one blind 11,700
5. Both 65 or over, not blind13,000
6. One 65 or over, and blind 13,000
7. One 65 or over, and both blind 14,300
8. Both 65 or over, and blind 15,600
C. Married filing Separate
1. Under 65, not blind $ 5,200
2. Under 65, and blind 6,500
3. 65 or over, not blind 6,500
4. 65 or over, and blind 7,800
These requirements apply as long as your legal residence is
Georgia, even if you are absent from or live outside the State temporarily. A credit for taxes paid to another state is allowe

2013 Federal Individual Tax Return Forms, Instructions and News

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Form 1040, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return

Annual income tax return filed by citizens or residents of the United States.

Instructions for Form 1040

Forms and Schedules for Form 1040

2013 news
Change in tax rates.
The highest tax rate for 2013 is 39.6%.
Tax rate on net capital gain and quali­fied dividends.
The maximum tax rate
of 15% on net capital gain and qualified
dividends has increased to 20% for some
taxpayers. The Qualified Dividends and
Capital Gain Tax Worksheet in the
line 44 instructions reflects this new,
higher rate.
Additional Medicare Tax.
Beginningin 2013, a 0.9% Additional Medicare
Tax applies to Medicare wages, railroad
retirement (RRTA) compensation, and
self-employment income that are more
than:
$125,000 if married filing separately,
$250,000 if married filing jointly,
or
$200,000 if single, head of household, or qualifying widow(er).

 

Net Investment Income Tax.
Beginning in 2013, you may be subject to Net
Investment Income Tax (NIIT). The
NIIT is 3.8% of the smaller of (a) your
net investment income or (b) the excess
of your modified adjusted gross income
over:
$125,000 if married filing separately,
$250,000 if married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er), or
$200,000 if single or head ofhousehold.

 

Filing status for same­sex marriedcouples.
If you have a same-sex spouse
whom you legally married in a state (or
foreign country) that recognizes
same-sex marriage, you and your spouse
generally must use the married filing
jointly or married filing separately filing
status on your 2013 return, even if you
and your spouse now live in a state (or
foreign country) that does not recognize
same-sex marriage.
Medical and dental expenses.
You candeduct only the part of your medical and
dental expenses that is more than 10%
of your adjusted gross income (7.5% if
either you or your spouse was born be-
fore January 2, 1949).
Personal exemption amount increased
for certain taxpayers.
Your personalexemption is increased to $3,900. But
the amount is reduced if your adjusted
gross income is more than:
$150,000 if married filing separately,
$250,000 if single,
$275,000 if head of household, or
$300,000 if married filing jointly
or qualifying widow(er).
Limit on itemized deductions.
Youmay not be able to deduct all of your
itemized deductions if your adjusted
gross income is more than:
$150,000 if married filing separately,
$250,000 if single,
$275,000 if head of household, or
$300,000 if married filing jointly
or qualifying widow(er).

 

Credit for prior year minimum tax.
The credit for prior year minimum tax is
no longer partly refundable.
Standard mileage rates.
The 2013 ratefor business use of your vehicle is in-
creased to 56 cents a mile. The 2013rate for use of your vehicle to get medical care or to move is increased to 24cents a mile.
Identity Protection Personal Identifi­
cation Number (IP PIN).
If you are filing electronically and both you and

your spouse received an IP PIN.

FATCA – Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act for Individuals

The provisions commonly known as the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA) became law in March 2010.
FATCA targets tax non-compliance by U.S. taxpayers with foreign accounts

FATCA focuses on reporting:

By U.S. taxpayers about certain foreign financial accounts and offshore assets

By foreign financial institutions about financial accounts held by U.S. taxpayers or foreign entities in which U.S. taxpayers hold a substantial ownership interest

The objective of FATCA is the reporting of foreign financial assets; withholding is the cost of not reporting. Notice 2013-43 revises the implementation timeline and provides additional guidance.

U.S. individual taxpayers must report information about certain foreign financial accounts and offshore assets on Form 8938 and attach it to their income tax return, if the total asset value exceeds the appropriate reporting threshold.
Form 8938 reporting is in addition to FBAR reporting

  • U.S. citizens, U.S. individual residents, and a very limited number of nonresident individuals who own certain foreign financial accounts or other offshore assets (specified foreign financial assets) must report those assets
  • Attach Form 8938 to the annual income tax return (usually Form 1040)
  • Taxpayers with a total value of specified foreign financial assets below a certain threshold do not have to file Form 8938
  • If the total value is at or below $50,000 at the end of the tax year, there is no reporting requirement for the year, unless the total value was more than $75,000 at any time during the tax year
  • The threshold is higher for individuals who live outside the United States
  • Thresholds are different for married and single taxpayers
  • Taxpayers who do not have to file an income tax return for the tax year do not have to file Form 8938, regardless of the value of their specified foreign financial assets.
  • Penalties apply for failure to file accurately

 

Source

 

Indiana 2012 Individual Income Tax Forms

INfreefile

Indiana Full-Year Residents

IT-40 Form 2012   IT-40 Income Tax Form

When filing, you must include Schedules 3 & 4, 7, and probably CT-40, along with Form IT-40. You must include Schedules 1 (add-backs), 2 (deductions), 5 (credits, such as Indiana withholding), 6 (offset credits) and IN-DEP (additional dependent information) if you have entries on those schedules.

 

IT-40 Booklet 2012   IT-40 Income Tax Instruction Booklet (not including form or schedules)

More forms

Rules of filing:

  • If you file a single federal income tax return, you must file a single Indiana individual income tax return.
  • If you file a joint federal income tax return, you must file a joint Indiana individual income tax return.

Form IT-40EZ is available for many Indiana full-year residents. Note: If you were a full-year Indiana resident, but you’re filing a joint return, and your spouse was not a full-year Indiana resident, you must file Form IT-40PNR.

This form is available for Indiana full-year residents who meet all of the following qualifications:

  • you must have filed a federal Form 1040EZ;
  • you must have been an Indiana full-year resident;
  • you must claim only the Renter’s Deduction and/or Unemployment Compensation Deduction (or none at all);
  • you must have had only Indiana state and county tax withholding credits and/or Automatic Taxpayer Refund credit (or none at all); and
  • you do not have any interest income from a direct obligation (acquired after Dec. 31, 2011) of a state or political subdivision other than Indiana.

Use Form IT-40 if you (and your spouse, if filing jointly) were a full-year Indiana resident and you do not qualify to file Form IT-40EZ.

Form IT-40RNR is available for individuals who meet both of the following requirements:

  • you must have been a full-year resident of one of the following states: Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania or Wisconsin; and
  • you must have received only the following types of income from Indiana: wages, salaries, tips or other compensation.

If you have any other kind of Indiana-source income, you’ll have to file Form IT-40PNR.

Form IT-40PNR is available if you (and/or your spouse if filing jointly) were an Indiana resident for less than a full year (or not at all) and you do not qualify to file Form IT-40RNR.

Examples

2012 Indiana County Income Tax Rates and County Codes

 

2012 California 540 & 540A Tax Forms – Personal Income Tax

Income Tax Forms

540 2EZ Form (Math) 2012 California Resident Income Tax Return (Fill-in with math features & save)
540 2EZ Form 2012 California Resident Income Tax Return
540 Form 2012 California Resident Income Tax Return (Fill-in & Save)
540A Form 2012 California Resident Income Tax Return (Fill-in & Save)
540ES Form 2012 Estimated Tax for Individuals (Fill-in)
540NR Form (Long) 2012 California Nonresident or Part-Year Resident Income Tax Return (Long) (Fill-in & Save)
540NR Form (Short) 2012 California Nonresident or Part-Year Resident Income Tax Return (Short) (Fill-in & Save)
540X Form 2012 Amended Individual Income Tax Return (Fill-in)

More forms

2012 California Tax Calulator

This calculator does not figure tax for the Form 540 2EZ.

2012 Tax Rates and Exemptions

E-file options

2012  Income Tax News

Tax Rate Increase – For taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2012, the
maximum personal income tax rate increased to 12.3%.

Qualified Small Business Stock – The California Court of Appeals has determined
that provisions of R&TC Sections 18038.5 and 18152.5 are unconstitutional
and therefore are invalid and unenforceable. See Schedule CA (540), line 13
instructions for more information if you reported a federal qualified small
business stock (QSBS) deferral or exclusion on your federal Form 1040.

Donated Fresh Fruits or Vegetables Credit – For taxable years beginning on
or after January 1, 2012, and before January 1, 2017, qualified taxpayers who
donate fresh fruits or fresh vegetables to a California food bank may receive
a credit equal to 10% of the donation’s costs. For more information get form
FTB 3811, Donated Fresh Fruits or Vegetables Credit or go to ftb.ca.gov and
search for credit for fresh fruits.

Voluntary Contributions – You may contribute to the following new funds:
• California YMCA Youth and Government Fund
• California Youth Leadership Fund
• School Supplies for Homeless Children Fund
• State Parks Protection Fund/Parks Pass Purchase

Community Development Financial Institutions Investment Credit – The
Community Development Financial Institutions Investment Credit has been
extended for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2012, and before
January 1, 2017.

Net Operating Loss – For taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2012,
California has reinstated the NOL carryover deductions.
For taxable years beginning in 2010 and 2011, California suspended the net
operating loss (NOL) carryover deduction. Taxpayers continued to compute and
carryover NOLs during the suspension period. However, taxpayers with modified
adjusted gross income of less than $300,000 or with disaster loss carryovers
were not affected by the NOL suspension rules.
Also, California modified the NOL carryback provision. For more information, see
form FTB 3805V, Net Operating Loss (NOL) Computation and NOL and Disaster
Loss Limitations — Individuals, Estates, and Trusts.

 Read more

.

When To File Form 4868 for 2011 Federal Tax Return – Due Dates, Penalties and Interests

File Form 4868 by April 17, 2012. Fiscal year taxpayers, file Form
4868 by the regular due date of the return.

Taxpayers who are out of the country. If, on the regular due date
of your return, you are out of the country and a U.S. citizen or
resident, you are allowed 2 extra months to file your return and pay
any amount due without requesting an extension. For a calendar
year return, this is June 15, 2012. File this form and be sure to
check the box on line 8 if you need an additional 4 months to file
your return.
If you are out of the country and a U.S. citizen or resident, you
may qualify for special tax treatment if you meet the foreign
residence or physical presence tests. If you do not expect to meet
either of those tests by the due date of your return, request an
extension to a date after you expect to qualify using Form 2350,
Application for Extension of Time To File U.S. Income Tax Return.

You are out of the country if:
• You live outside the United States and Puerto Rico and your main
place of work is outside the United States and Puerto Rico, or
• You are in military or naval service outside the United States and
Puerto Rico.
If you qualify as being out of the country, you will still be eligible
for the extension even if you are physically present in the United
States or Puerto Rico on the regular due date of the return.
For more information on extensions for taxpayers out of the
country, see Pub. 54, Tax Guide for U.S. Citizens and Resident
Aliens Abroad.

Form 1040NR or 1040NR-EZ filers. If you cannot file your return by
the due date, you should file Form 4868. You must file Form 4868
by the regular due date of the return.
If you did not receive wages as an employee subject to U.S.
income tax withholding, and your return is due June 15, 2012,
check the box on line 9.

Total Time Allowed
Generally, we cannot extend the due date of your return for more
than 6 months (October 15, 2012, for most calendar year
taxpayers). However, there may be an exception if you are living
out of the country. See Pub. 54 for more information.

Filing Your Tax Return
You can file your tax return any time before the extension expires.
Do not attach a copy of Form 4868 to your return.
Interest
You will owe interest on any tax not paid by the regular due date of
your return, even if you qualify for the 2-month extension because

you were out of the country. The interest runs until you pay the tax.
Even if you had a good reason for not paying on time, you will still
owe interest.

Late Payment Penalty
The late payment penalty is usually ½ of 1% of any tax (other than
estimated tax) not paid by April 17, 2012. It is charged for each
month or part of a month the tax is unpaid. The maximum penalty
is 25%.
The late payment penalty will not be charged if you can show
reasonable cause for not paying on time. Attach a statement to
your return fully explaining the reason. Do not attach the statement
to Form 4868.
You are considered to have reasonable cause for the period
covered by this automatic extension if at least 90% of your actual
2011 tax liability is paid before the regular due date of your return
through withholding, estimated tax payments, or payments made
with Form 4868.

Late Filing Penalty
A late filing penalty is usually charged if your return is filed after the
due date (including extensions). The penalty is usually 5% of the
amount due for each month or part of a month your return is late.
The maximum penalty is 25%. If your return is more than 60 days
late, the minimum penalty is $135 or the balance of the tax due on
your return, whichever is smaller. You might not owe the penalty if
you have a reasonable explanation for filing late. Attach a
statement to your return fully explaining the reason. Do not attach
the statement to Form 4868.

Read more

Alternative Minimum Tax 2011

The tax law provides exclusions for certain kinds of income and deductions and credits for certain expenses. The alternative minimum tax (AMT) attempts to ensure that an individual who benefits from certain exclusions, deductions, or credits pays at least a minimum amount of tax.

The AMT is a separately figured tax that eliminates or reduces many exclusions and deductions. In addition, certain credits (generally, business-related credits) cannot be used to offset the AMT. Thus the AMT increases the tax liability of an individual who would otherwise pay less tax. The AMT tax rates on ordinary income are percentages set by law. For capital gains and certain dividends, the rates in effect for the regular tax are used.

2011 Instructions for Form 6251 – Alternative Minimum Tax—Individuals

Exemption amount.

The exemption amount has increased to $48,450 ($74,450 if married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er); $37,225 if married filing separately).

Who Must File

Attach Form 6251 to your return if any of the following statements is true.

  1. Form 6251, line 31, is greater than line 34.
  2. You claim any general business credit, and either line 6 (in Part I) or line 25 of Form 3800 is more than zero.
  3. You claim the qualified electric vehicle credit, the personal use part of the alternative fuel vehicle refueling property credit, or the credit for prior year minimum tax.
  4. The total of Form 6251, lines 8 through 27, is negative and line 31 would be greater than line 34 if you did not take into account lines 8 through 27.

 

Purpose of Form

Use Form 6251 to figure the amount, if any, of your alternative minimum tax (AMT). The AMT applies to taxpayers who have certain types of income that receive favorable treatment, or who qualify for certain deductions, under the tax law. These tax benefits can significantly reduce the regular tax of some taxpayers with higher economic incomes. The AMT sets a limit on the amount these benefits can be used to reduce total tax.

Also use Form 6251 to help you figure the tax liability limit on the credits listed under Who Must File.

Recordkeeping

For the AMT, certain items of income, deductions, etc., receive different tax treatment than for the regular tax. Therefore, you need to refigure items for the AMT that you figured for the regular tax. In some cases, you may wish to do this by completing the applicable tax form a second time. If you do complete another form, do not attach it to your tax return, but keep it for your records. However, you may have to attach an AMT Form 1116, Foreign Tax Credit, to your return; see the instructions for line 32.

For the regular tax, some deductions and credits may result in carrybacks or carryforwards to other tax years. Examples are investment interest expense, a net operating loss, a capital loss, a passive activity loss, and the foreign tax credit. Because you may have to refigure these items for the AMT, the carryback or carryforward amount may be different for the AMT than for the regular tax. Your at-risk limits and basis amounts also may differ for the AMT. Therefore, you must keep records of these different amounts.

Partners and Shareholders

If you are a partner in a partnership or a shareholder in an S corporation, see Schedule K-1 and its instructions to figure your adjustments or preferences from the partnership or S corporation to include on Form 6251.

Nonresident Aliens

If you are a nonresident alien and you disposed of U.S. real property interests at a gain, you must make a special computation. Fill in Form 6251 through line 30. If your net gain from the disposition of U.S. real property interests and the amount on line 28 are both greater than the tentative amount you figured for line 30, replace the amount on line 30 with the smaller of that net gain or the amount on line 28. Also, enter “RPI” on the dotted line next to line 30. Otherwise, do not change line 30.

Credit for Prior Year Minimum Tax

See Form 8801, Credit for Prior Year Minimum Tax—Individuals, Estates, and Trusts, if you paid AMT for 2010 or you had a minimum tax credit carryforward on your 2010 Form 8801. If you pay AMT for 2011, you may be able to take a credit on Form 8801 for 2012.

Optional Write-Off for Certain Expenditures

There is no AMT adjustment for the following items if you elect for the regular tax to deduct them ratably over the period of time shown.

  • Circulation expenditures—3 years (section 173).
  • Research and experimental expenditures—10 years (section 174(a)).
  • Mining exploration and development costs—10 years (sections 616(a) and 617(a)).
  • Intangible drilling costs—60 months (section 263(c))

Read more

Form 6251

Instructions for Form 6251 (HTML)

Use Form 6251 to figure the amount, if any, of your alternative minimum tax (AMT). The AMT applies to taxpayers who have ceertain types of income that receive favorable treatment, or who qualify for certain deductions, under the tax law. These tax benefits can significantly reduce the regular tax of some taxpayers with higher economic incomes. The AMT sets a limit on the amount these benefits can be used to reduce total tax.

To find out if you may be subject to the AMT, refer to the Form 1040 Instructions and the Form 1040A Instructions. If you are filing the Form 1040 you may use the AMT Assistant for Individuals, which is an electronic version of the AMT worksheet available on the IRS web page at www.irs.gov. The AMT worksheet may tell you that you do not owe the AMT or it may direct you to Form 6251, Alternative Minimum Tax – Individuals. If you are directed to Form 6251, you will have to complete that form to determine whether you owe the AMT. Form 6251 (PDF), Alternative Minimum Tax – Individuals, is available in a PDF format on the IRS web page.

If you are not liable for AMT this year, but you paid AMT in one or more previous years, you may be eligible to take a special minimum tax credit against your regular tax this year. If eligible, you should complete and attach Form 8801 (PDF), Credit for Prior Year Minimum Tax – Individuals, Estates, and Trusts.

Tax Year 2011 AMT Assistant

North Carolina 2011 Individual Tax Return Forms

D-400 with TC  Individual Income Tax Return and Form D-400TC, Individual Tax Credits (You must include Form D-400TC if you claim any tax credits.) [web fill-in, instructions]

D-400 without TC   Individual Income Tax Return (no tax credits) [web fill-in, instructions]

D-401  Individual Income Tax Instructions for Form D-400

More forms

Tax Rate Schedule for Tax Year 2011

Tax calculator

More info about Individual tax return
E-file

2011 news

• North Carolina no longer has an income tax surtax.
• An addition is required on the 2011 income tax return for taxpayers claiming bonus depreciation and
section 179 expense deduction.
• A deduction is allowed for individuals who added back bonus depreciation and section 179 expense
deduction on their 2010 income tax return.
• A tax credit for children with disabilities who require special education is available to certain taxpayers.

New York State 2011 Individual Tax Return Forms

IT-201 Resident Income Tax Return

You must file Form IT-201 if you were a New York State resident for the entire year. You must also complete Form IT-201-ATT, Other Tax Credits and Taxes, and attach it to your IT-201 if you are:

  • subject to other New York State or New York City taxes
  • claiming any credits other than those claimed directly on Form IT-201. (e.g., long-term care insurance credit, New York City resident UBT credit, and farmer’s school credit)

Form and Instructions:

IT-201 Resident Income Tax Return

IT-201-I Instructions

 

IT-203 Nonresident and Part-Year Resident Income Tax Return

You must file Form IT-203 if you:

  • were not a resident of New York State and received income during the tax year from New York State sources, or
  • moved into or out of New York State during the tax year.

You are subject to New York State income tax on:

  • income you received from New York sources while you were a nonresident
  • all income you received while you were a New York State resident.

Form and Instructions:

IT-203 Nonresident and Part-Year Resident Income Tax Return form

IT-203-I Instructions

More New York State Individual Tax return forms

 

2011 Income tax news

General changes for 2011

Same-sex married couples – tax return filing obligations
The Marriage Equality Act, which took effect on July 24, 2011, provides that all marriages, whether of same-sex couples or different-sex couples, will be treated equally under the laws of New York. For tax years 2011 and after, same-sex married couples who are married as of the last day of the tax year must file New York personal income tax returns using a married filing status, even though their marital status is not recognized for federal income tax purposes. For additional information, see Personal income tax information for same-sex married couples.

Three ways to get your refund
We’re offering three refund choices: direct deposit, debit cards (new), and paper checks.

Form IT-150 (short form) discontinued
Form IT-150, Resident Income Tax Return (short form), has been discontinued. All full-year New York State residents must now use Form IT-201 to file and pay their taxes.

Date of birth required on income tax return
Taxpayers must now enter their date of birth (and their spouse’s date of birth, if applicable) on their primary returns.

Yonkers resident income tax surcharge increased
For tax years beginning on and after 2011, the rate of the Yonkers resident income tax surcharge has been increased from 10% to 15% of the net state tax.

E-file requirement for individual taxpayers
Individual taxpayers who prepare their personal income tax returns using tax software are generally required to file electronically. A taxpayer who is required to e-file and fails to do so will be subject to a penalty and will not be eligible to receive interest on any overpayment until the return is filed electronically. For additional information, see E-file mandate for individuals.

Federal extension forms no longer accepted
For tax years beginning on and after 2011, a copy of federal Form 4868, Application for Automatic Extension of Time to File U.S. Individual Income Tax Return, or Form 7004, Application for Automatic Extension of Time to File Certain Business Income Tax, Information, and Other Returns, will no longer be accepted in place of New York Form IT-370, Application for Automatic Six-Month Extension of Time to File for Individuals, or Form IT-370-PF, Application for Automatic Extension of Time to File for Partnerships and Fiduciaries. For additional information, see Important Notice, N-11-16.

E-file mandate for tax return preparers revised
The threshold for determining if tax return preparers are required to e-file their clients’ tax documents has been reduced to five original tax documents. In addition, if a tax return preparer is required to e-file a client’s tax document and fails to do so, both the preparer and the client may be subject to a penalty, and the client will not be eligible to receive interest on any overpayment until the tax document is filed electronically. For additional information, see E-file mandate for tax preparers.

Online Account Summary
As part of our expansion into electronic communication, the Tax Department is offering new online services. Our Online Account Summary allows you to:

  • receive e-mail alerts and reminders about your tax account, including notification of your refund
  • view a comprehensive, customized summary of your account
  • respond to department notices
  • update account information

For additional information, see Online Services for Individuals.

Tax shelter reporting requirements extended
The expiration date of the reporting requirements and related administrative provisions concerning the disclosure of certain federal and New York State reportable transactions and related information regarding tax shelters has been extended to July 1, 2015. For additional information, see TSB-M-11(5)C, (5)I, Extension of Tax Shelter Disclosure and Penalty Provisions.

Lottery prizes may be applied against tax liabilities
A lottery prize winning of more than $600 may now be applied against the winner’s outstanding New York tax liabilities.

New credit

Economic transformation and facility redevelopment program
This new program provides tax incentives to businesses to stimulate redevelopment in targeted communities where certain correctional or juvenile facilities are closed. For additional information, see TSB-M-11(6)I, Summary of Budget Bill Personal Income Tax Changes Enacted in 2011, and Form IT-633, Economic Transformation and Facility Redevelopment Program Tax Credit, and its instructions.

Changes to existing credits

Credits for taxicab and livery service vehicles accessible to persons with disabilities
The credit for taxicab and livery service vehicles accessible to persons with disabilities expired for costs incurred after December 31, 2010. However, any unused credit from a prior year can be carried over until used. For additional information, see Form IT-239, Claim for Credit for Taxicabs and Livery Service Vehicles Accessible to Persons with Disabilities.

Alternative fuels credit
The credit for investing in new alternative-fuel vehicle refueling property expired for tax years beginning on and after January 1, 2011. However, any unused credit from a prior year can be carried over until used. For additional information, see Form IT-253, Claim for Alternative Fuels Credit.

Investment tax credits for the financial services industry
The investment tax credit (ITC) for the financial services industry has been extended to include property placed in service before October 1, 2015. The empire zone (EZ) ITC for the financial services industry has been extended to include property placed in service before April 1, 2014 (when the EZs are deemed to expire). However, a financial services business that places property in service between April 1, 2014, and October 1, 2015, may still claim the regular ITC for the financial services industry on that property. For additional information, see Forms IT-252, Investment Tax Credit for the Financial Services Industry, and IT-605, Claim for EZ Investment Tax Credit and EZ Employment Incentive Credit for the Financial Services Industry, and their instructions.

Excelsior Jobs Program Act
The benefit period of the Excelsior Jobs Program has been extended from five years to ten. Several other administrative changes were made to the program and to how the credit is computed. For additional information, see TSB-M-11(6)I, Summary of Budget Bill Personal Income Tax Changes Enacted in 2011, and Form IT-607, Claim for Excelsior Jobs Program Tax Credit, and its instructions.

New modification

Subtraction modification for QEZE credit for real property taxes
A new subtraction modification is available for any amount of QEZE credit for real property taxes included in federal adjusted gross income. For additional information, see TSB-M-10(9)(C), (15)I, New York State Tax Treatment of Refunds of the Qualified Empire Zone Enterprise (QEZE) Credit for Real Property Taxes.

Source: tax.ny.gov