Report Certain Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts by June 30, 2015

The Internal Revenue Service today reminded everyone who has one or more bank or financial accounts located outside the United States, or signature authority over such accounts, that they may need to file an FBAR by next Tuesday, June 30.

FBAR refers to Report 114, Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts, which must be filed with the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN), a bureau of the Treasury Department. It is not a tax form and cannot be filed with the IRS. The form must be filed electronically and is only available online through the BSA E-Filing System website.

In general, the filing requirement applies to anyone who had an interest in, or signature or other authority over foreign financial accounts whose aggregate value exceeded $10,000 at any time during 2014. Because of this threshold, the IRS encourages taxpayers with foreign assets, even relatively small ones, to check if this filing requirement applies to them.

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California Income Tax 2014

2014 California 540  Tax Forms – Personal Income Tax

On this page you will find:

-  Forms 540  (California Resident Income Tax Return) and instructions how to fill this forms.

- California Nonresident or Part-Year Resident Income Tax Return

- Amended Individual Income Tax Return

-Estimated Tax for Individuals

California State Individual Income Tax Forms 2014

2014 California Tax Calulator

2014 Tax Rates and Exemptions

 

Individual tax rates

  • The maximum rate for individuals is 12.3%
  • The AMT rate for individuals is 7%
  • The Mental Health Services Tax Rate is 1% for taxable income in excess of $1,000,000.

2014 California 540 Tax Forms – Personal Income Tax

540 Form 2014 California Resident Income Tax Return (Fill-in & Save)
540 Instructions 2014 Instructions for 540 Form, California Resident Income Tax Returns
540 Tax Table 2014 Tax Table for 540 Tax Return
540-2EZ Form 2014 California Resident Income Tax Return (Fill-in with math features & save)
540-2EZ Instructions 2014 Instructions for 540-2EZ Form, California Resident Income Tax Return
540-2EZ Tax Table 2014 Tax Table for 540-2EZ Tax Return
540-2EZ Formulario 2014 Declaración de Impuesto Sobre el Ingreso de Residente de California (Fill-in)
540-2EZ Instrucciones 2014 Instrucciones para el Formulario 540-2EZ, Declaración de Impuesto Sobre el Ingreso de Residente de California
540-ES Form 2014 Estimated Tax for Individuals (Fill-in & Save)
540-ES Instructions 2014 Instructions for 540-ES Form, Estimated Tax for Individuals
540-NR Form (Long) 2014 California Nonresident or Part-Year Resident Income Tax Return (Long) (Fill-in & Save)
540-NR Instructions (Long) 2014 Instructions for 540-NR Long Form, California Nonresident or Part-Year Resident Income Tax Return (Long)
540-NR Form (Short) 2014 California Nonresident or Part-Year Resident Income Tax Return (Short) (Fill-in & Save)
540-NR Instructions (Short) 2014 Instructions for 540-NR Short Form, California Nonresident or Part-Year Resident Income Tax Return (Short)
540-NR Tax Table 2014 Tax Table for 540-NR Tax Return

2013 Individual Federal Income Tax Return Changes

Standard mileage rates. The 2013 rate for business use of your car is increased to 56½ cents a mile. The 2013 rate for use of your car to get medical care is increased to 24 cents a mile. The 2013 rate for use of your car to move is increased to 24 cents a mile.

Change in tax rates. The highest tax rate is 39.6%.

Net Investment Income Tax. Beginning in 2013, you may be subject to Net Investment Income Tax (NIIT). The NIIT is 3.8% of the smaller of (a) your net investment income or (b) the excess of your modified adjusted gross income over:

  • $125,000 if married filing separately,
  • $250,000 if married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er), or
  • $200,000 if any other filing status.

Tax rate on net capital gain and qualified dividends. The maximum tax rate of 15% on net capital gain and qualified dividends has increased to 20% for some taxpayers.

Medical and dental expenses. You can deduct only the part of your medical and dental expenses that is more than 10% of your adjusted gross income (7.5% if either you or your spouse is age 65 or older).

Personal exemption amount increased for certain taxpayers. Your personal exemption is increased to $3,900. But the amount is reduced if your adjusted gross income is more than:

  • $150,000 if married filing separately,
  • $250,000 if single,
  • $275,000 if head of household, or
  • $300,000 if any other filing status.

Limit on itemized deductions. You may not be able to deduct all of your itemized deductions if your adjusted gross income is more than:

  • $150,000 if married filing separately,
  • $250,000 if single,
  • $275,000 if head of household, or
  • $300,000 if any other filing status.

Same-sex marriages. If you have a same-sex spouse whom you legally married in a state (or foreign country) that recognizes same-sex marriage, you and your spouse generally must use the married filing jointly or married filing separately filing status on your 2013 return, even if you and your spouse now live in a state (or foreign country) that does not recognize same-sex marriage.

Health flexible spending arrangements (FSAs). You cannot have more than $2,500 in salary reduction contributions made to a health FSA for plan years beginning after 2012.

Expiring credits. The plug-in electric vehicle credit and the refundable part of the credit for prior year minimum tax have expired. You cannot claim either one on your 2013 return.

Pnzi-type investment schemes. There are new rules for how to claim a theft loss deduction on Form 4684 due to a Ponzi-type investment scheme.

Home office deduction simplified method. If you can take a home office deduction, you may be able to use a simplified method to figure it. See Publication 587.

Additional Medicare Tax. Beginning in 2013, a 0.9% Additional Medicare Tax applies to Medicare wages, railroad retirement (RRTA) compensation, and self-employment income that are more than:

  • $125,000 if married filing separately,
  • $250,000 if married filing jointly, or
  • $200,000 for any other filing status.

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Georgia 2013 Individual Tax Return Forms and Instructions

 

2013 Individual Income Tax Forms 
Form IT- 511 Individual Income Tax Instruction Booklet IT- 511
Form 500 Individual Income Tax Return and IND-CR Individual Credit Form (Fill in on-line, print and mail) (rev. 7/13) 500
Form 500-EZ Short Individual Income Tax Return (Fill in on-line, print and mail) (rev. 7/13) 500-EZ
Form IND-CR Individual Income Tax Credit (rev. 7/13) IND-CR
Form IT-560 Individual / Fiduciary Extension Payment (Fill in on-line, print and mail) (rev. 7/13) IT-560
2013 Form 500-ES Estimated Tax for Individuals and Fiduciaries (Fill in on-line, print and mail) (rev. 9/12) 500-ES – 2013
2014 Form 500-ES Estimated Tax for Individuals and Fiduciaries (Fill in on-line, print and mail) (rev. 7/13) 500-ES – 2014
Form 525-TV Form 525-TV Payment Voucher (Fill in on-line, print and mail) (rev. 7/13) 525-TV
Form 500-NOL Application for Net Operating Loss Adjustment (other than corporations) (rev. 7/13) 500-NOL
Form 500X Amended Individual Income Tax Return (rev. 7/13) 500X
Form 2106 Employee Business Expenses (rev. 7/13) 2106
Form 4562 Depreciation and Amortization (rev. 7/13) 4562
Form 500-UET Underpayment of Estimated Tax by Individuals/ Fiduciary (rev. 10/12) 500-UET
Form GA-8453 Individual Income Tax Declaration for Electronic Filing or 2D Barcode Direct Deposit (rev. 8/13) GA-8453
Form IT-550 Claim for Refund of Georgia Income Tax Erroneously or Illegally Collected (rev. 8/13) IT-550
Form IT-303 Application for Extension of Time for Filing State Income Tax Returns (rev. 12/12) IT-303
Form GA-5347 Statement of Person Claiming Refund on Behalf of a Deceased Taxpayer (rev. 1/13) GA-5347
Form GA-9465 Installment Agreement Request Form (rev. 6/12) GA-9465
Replacement Check Request (rev. 5/12) Form IA-81
Full-year Residents
Full-year residents are taxed on all income, except tax exempt
income, regardless of the source or where derived. You are
required to file a Georgia income tax return if:
You are required to file a Federal income tax return;
You have income subject to Georgia income tax that is
not subject to Federal income tax;
Your income exceeds the standard deduction and
personal exemptions as indicated below:
Single, Head of Household or Qualifying Widow(er)
1. Under 65, not blind $5,000
2. Under 65, and blind 6,300
3. 65 or over, not blind 6,300
4. 65 or over, and blind 7,600
B. Married filing Joint
1. Both under 65, not blind $ 10,400
2. One 65 or over, not blind 11,700
3. Both under 65, both blind 13,000
4. Both under 65, one blind 11,700
5. Both 65 or over, not blind13,000
6. One 65 or over, and blind 13,000
7. One 65 or over, and both blind 14,300
8. Both 65 or over, and blind 15,600
C. Married filing Separate
1. Under 65, not blind $ 5,200
2. Under 65, and blind 6,500
3. 65 or over, not blind 6,500
4. 65 or over, and blind 7,800
These requirements apply as long as your legal residence is
Georgia, even if you are absent from or live outside the State temporarily. A credit for taxes paid to another state is allowe

2013 Federal Individual Tax Return Forms, Instructions and News

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Form 1040, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return

Annual income tax return filed by citizens or residents of the United States.

Instructions for Form 1040

Forms and Schedules for Form 1040

2013 news
Change in tax rates.
The highest tax rate for 2013 is 39.6%.
Tax rate on net capital gain and quali­fied dividends.
The maximum tax rate
of 15% on net capital gain and qualified
dividends has increased to 20% for some
taxpayers. The Qualified Dividends and
Capital Gain Tax Worksheet in the
line 44 instructions reflects this new,
higher rate.
Additional Medicare Tax.
Beginningin 2013, a 0.9% Additional Medicare
Tax applies to Medicare wages, railroad
retirement (RRTA) compensation, and
self-employment income that are more
than:
$125,000 if married filing separately,
$250,000 if married filing jointly,
or
$200,000 if single, head of household, or qualifying widow(er).

 

Net Investment Income Tax.
Beginning in 2013, you may be subject to Net
Investment Income Tax (NIIT). The
NIIT is 3.8% of the smaller of (a) your
net investment income or (b) the excess
of your modified adjusted gross income
over:
$125,000 if married filing separately,
$250,000 if married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er), or
$200,000 if single or head ofhousehold.

 

Filing status for same­sex marriedcouples.
If you have a same-sex spouse
whom you legally married in a state (or
foreign country) that recognizes
same-sex marriage, you and your spouse
generally must use the married filing
jointly or married filing separately filing
status on your 2013 return, even if you
and your spouse now live in a state (or
foreign country) that does not recognize
same-sex marriage.
Medical and dental expenses.
You candeduct only the part of your medical and
dental expenses that is more than 10%
of your adjusted gross income (7.5% if
either you or your spouse was born be-
fore January 2, 1949).
Personal exemption amount increased
for certain taxpayers.
Your personalexemption is increased to $3,900. But
the amount is reduced if your adjusted
gross income is more than:
$150,000 if married filing separately,
$250,000 if single,
$275,000 if head of household, or
$300,000 if married filing jointly
or qualifying widow(er).
Limit on itemized deductions.
Youmay not be able to deduct all of your
itemized deductions if your adjusted
gross income is more than:
$150,000 if married filing separately,
$250,000 if single,
$275,000 if head of household, or
$300,000 if married filing jointly
or qualifying widow(er).

 

Credit for prior year minimum tax.
The credit for prior year minimum tax is
no longer partly refundable.
Standard mileage rates.
The 2013 ratefor business use of your vehicle is in-
creased to 56 cents a mile. The 2013rate for use of your vehicle to get medical care or to move is increased to 24cents a mile.
Identity Protection Personal Identifi­
cation Number (IP PIN).
If you are filing electronically and both you and

your spouse received an IP PIN.

FATCA – Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act for Individuals

The provisions commonly known as the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA) became law in March 2010.
FATCA targets tax non-compliance by U.S. taxpayers with foreign accounts

FATCA focuses on reporting:

By U.S. taxpayers about certain foreign financial accounts and offshore assets

By foreign financial institutions about financial accounts held by U.S. taxpayers or foreign entities in which U.S. taxpayers hold a substantial ownership interest

The objective of FATCA is the reporting of foreign financial assets; withholding is the cost of not reporting. Notice 2013-43 revises the implementation timeline and provides additional guidance.

U.S. individual taxpayers must report information about certain foreign financial accounts and offshore assets on Form 8938 and attach it to their income tax return, if the total asset value exceeds the appropriate reporting threshold.
Form 8938 reporting is in addition to FBAR reporting

  • U.S. citizens, U.S. individual residents, and a very limited number of nonresident individuals who own certain foreign financial accounts or other offshore assets (specified foreign financial assets) must report those assets
  • Attach Form 8938 to the annual income tax return (usually Form 1040)
  • Taxpayers with a total value of specified foreign financial assets below a certain threshold do not have to file Form 8938
  • If the total value is at or below $50,000 at the end of the tax year, there is no reporting requirement for the year, unless the total value was more than $75,000 at any time during the tax year
  • The threshold is higher for individuals who live outside the United States
  • Thresholds are different for married and single taxpayers
  • Taxpayers who do not have to file an income tax return for the tax year do not have to file Form 8938, regardless of the value of their specified foreign financial assets.
  • Penalties apply for failure to file accurately

 

Source

 

Indiana 2012 Individual Income Tax Forms

INfreefile

Indiana Full-Year Residents

IT-40 Form 2012   IT-40 Income Tax Form

When filing, you must include Schedules 3 & 4, 7, and probably CT-40, along with Form IT-40. You must include Schedules 1 (add-backs), 2 (deductions), 5 (credits, such as Indiana withholding), 6 (offset credits) and IN-DEP (additional dependent information) if you have entries on those schedules.

 

IT-40 Booklet 2012   IT-40 Income Tax Instruction Booklet (not including form or schedules)

More forms

Rules of filing:

  • If you file a single federal income tax return, you must file a single Indiana individual income tax return.
  • If you file a joint federal income tax return, you must file a joint Indiana individual income tax return.

Form IT-40EZ is available for many Indiana full-year residents. Note: If you were a full-year Indiana resident, but you’re filing a joint return, and your spouse was not a full-year Indiana resident, you must file Form IT-40PNR.

This form is available for Indiana full-year residents who meet all of the following qualifications:

  • you must have filed a federal Form 1040EZ;
  • you must have been an Indiana full-year resident;
  • you must claim only the Renter’s Deduction and/or Unemployment Compensation Deduction (or none at all);
  • you must have had only Indiana state and county tax withholding credits and/or Automatic Taxpayer Refund credit (or none at all); and
  • you do not have any interest income from a direct obligation (acquired after Dec. 31, 2011) of a state or political subdivision other than Indiana.

Use Form IT-40 if you (and your spouse, if filing jointly) were a full-year Indiana resident and you do not qualify to file Form IT-40EZ.

Form IT-40RNR is available for individuals who meet both of the following requirements:

  • you must have been a full-year resident of one of the following states: Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania or Wisconsin; and
  • you must have received only the following types of income from Indiana: wages, salaries, tips or other compensation.

If you have any other kind of Indiana-source income, you’ll have to file Form IT-40PNR.

Form IT-40PNR is available if you (and/or your spouse if filing jointly) were an Indiana resident for less than a full year (or not at all) and you do not qualify to file Form IT-40RNR.

Examples

2012 Indiana County Income Tax Rates and County Codes

 

2012 California 540 & 540A Tax Forms – Personal Income Tax

Income Tax Forms

540 2EZ Form (Math) 2012 California Resident Income Tax Return (Fill-in with math features & save)
540 2EZ Form 2012 California Resident Income Tax Return
540 Form 2012 California Resident Income Tax Return (Fill-in & Save)
540A Form 2012 California Resident Income Tax Return (Fill-in & Save)
540ES Form 2012 Estimated Tax for Individuals (Fill-in)
540NR Form (Long) 2012 California Nonresident or Part-Year Resident Income Tax Return (Long) (Fill-in & Save)
540NR Form (Short) 2012 California Nonresident or Part-Year Resident Income Tax Return (Short) (Fill-in & Save)
540X Form 2012 Amended Individual Income Tax Return (Fill-in)

More forms

2012 California Tax Calulator

This calculator does not figure tax for the Form 540 2EZ.

2012 Tax Rates and Exemptions

E-file options

2012  Income Tax News

Tax Rate Increase – For taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2012, the
maximum personal income tax rate increased to 12.3%.

Qualified Small Business Stock – The California Court of Appeals has determined
that provisions of R&TC Sections 18038.5 and 18152.5 are unconstitutional
and therefore are invalid and unenforceable. See Schedule CA (540), line 13
instructions for more information if you reported a federal qualified small
business stock (QSBS) deferral or exclusion on your federal Form 1040.

Donated Fresh Fruits or Vegetables Credit – For taxable years beginning on
or after January 1, 2012, and before January 1, 2017, qualified taxpayers who
donate fresh fruits or fresh vegetables to a California food bank may receive
a credit equal to 10% of the donation’s costs. For more information get form
FTB 3811, Donated Fresh Fruits or Vegetables Credit or go to ftb.ca.gov and
search for credit for fresh fruits.

Voluntary Contributions – You may contribute to the following new funds:
• California YMCA Youth and Government Fund
• California Youth Leadership Fund
• School Supplies for Homeless Children Fund
• State Parks Protection Fund/Parks Pass Purchase

Community Development Financial Institutions Investment Credit – The
Community Development Financial Institutions Investment Credit has been
extended for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2012, and before
January 1, 2017.

Net Operating Loss – For taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2012,
California has reinstated the NOL carryover deductions.
For taxable years beginning in 2010 and 2011, California suspended the net
operating loss (NOL) carryover deduction. Taxpayers continued to compute and
carryover NOLs during the suspension period. However, taxpayers with modified
adjusted gross income of less than $300,000 or with disaster loss carryovers
were not affected by the NOL suspension rules.
Also, California modified the NOL carryback provision. For more information, see
form FTB 3805V, Net Operating Loss (NOL) Computation and NOL and Disaster
Loss Limitations — Individuals, Estates, and Trusts.

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.

When To File Form 4868 for 2011 Federal Tax Return – Due Dates, Penalties and Interests

File Form 4868 by April 17, 2012. Fiscal year taxpayers, file Form
4868 by the regular due date of the return.

Taxpayers who are out of the country. If, on the regular due date
of your return, you are out of the country and a U.S. citizen or
resident, you are allowed 2 extra months to file your return and pay
any amount due without requesting an extension. For a calendar
year return, this is June 15, 2012. File this form and be sure to
check the box on line 8 if you need an additional 4 months to file
your return.
If you are out of the country and a U.S. citizen or resident, you
may qualify for special tax treatment if you meet the foreign
residence or physical presence tests. If you do not expect to meet
either of those tests by the due date of your return, request an
extension to a date after you expect to qualify using Form 2350,
Application for Extension of Time To File U.S. Income Tax Return.

You are out of the country if:
• You live outside the United States and Puerto Rico and your main
place of work is outside the United States and Puerto Rico, or
• You are in military or naval service outside the United States and
Puerto Rico.
If you qualify as being out of the country, you will still be eligible
for the extension even if you are physically present in the United
States or Puerto Rico on the regular due date of the return.
For more information on extensions for taxpayers out of the
country, see Pub. 54, Tax Guide for U.S. Citizens and Resident
Aliens Abroad.

Form 1040NR or 1040NR-EZ filers. If you cannot file your return by
the due date, you should file Form 4868. You must file Form 4868
by the regular due date of the return.
If you did not receive wages as an employee subject to U.S.
income tax withholding, and your return is due June 15, 2012,
check the box on line 9.

Total Time Allowed
Generally, we cannot extend the due date of your return for more
than 6 months (October 15, 2012, for most calendar year
taxpayers). However, there may be an exception if you are living
out of the country. See Pub. 54 for more information.

Filing Your Tax Return
You can file your tax return any time before the extension expires.
Do not attach a copy of Form 4868 to your return.
Interest
You will owe interest on any tax not paid by the regular due date of
your return, even if you qualify for the 2-month extension because

you were out of the country. The interest runs until you pay the tax.
Even if you had a good reason for not paying on time, you will still
owe interest.

Late Payment Penalty
The late payment penalty is usually ½ of 1% of any tax (other than
estimated tax) not paid by April 17, 2012. It is charged for each
month or part of a month the tax is unpaid. The maximum penalty
is 25%.
The late payment penalty will not be charged if you can show
reasonable cause for not paying on time. Attach a statement to
your return fully explaining the reason. Do not attach the statement
to Form 4868.
You are considered to have reasonable cause for the period
covered by this automatic extension if at least 90% of your actual
2011 tax liability is paid before the regular due date of your return
through withholding, estimated tax payments, or payments made
with Form 4868.

Late Filing Penalty
A late filing penalty is usually charged if your return is filed after the
due date (including extensions). The penalty is usually 5% of the
amount due for each month or part of a month your return is late.
The maximum penalty is 25%. If your return is more than 60 days
late, the minimum penalty is $135 or the balance of the tax due on
your return, whichever is smaller. You might not owe the penalty if
you have a reasonable explanation for filing late. Attach a
statement to your return fully explaining the reason. Do not attach
the statement to Form 4868.

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