Online Accounting Game – Bank On It

Bank On It features more than 1,000 questions inspired by content in accounting textbooks. The game challenges students on accounting fundamentals and real-world workplace scenarios in the context of an online board game.

The concept for the game was designed by high school students who won AICPA’s Project Innovation Competition. Their submission focused on creating an accounting version of a traditional board game. The questions in Bank On IT have been reviewed by CPAs and the game provides incorrect-answer explanations and rationale to increase student’s understanding of the accounting profession. In addition, the game weaves in real-life professional scenarios and reinforces principles already being taught in the classroom.

Students can play at one of two levels and can focus on one of three sectors, business and industry, public accounting or non-profit accounting. The game is won by reaching the winning bank balance set prior to starting. Players earn money by answering questions correctly and landing on other strategic spaces as they move around the board.

Bank On It provides a customizable experience for teachers as well. Educators who are registered on Start Here, Go Places. are given a unique classroom code  they can distribute to their students to track their progress. Students can play against each other, against other online players or against the computer, with the option of taking part in up to 10 games at once. In addition, the game is mobile-friendly – so students can play from their smartphones.

Source

2013 CPA Q1 and Q2 Score Release Timetables

Score Release Timetables for the January/February (’13Q1) and April/May (’13Q2) testing windows

Day in Testing Window* Target Release Date Timeline Target ’13Q1 Score Release Target ’13Q2 Score Release
Day 1 – 20 11 business days following day 20 of the testing window February 5 May 6
Day 21 – 45 6 business days following day 45 of the testing window February 25 May 23
Day 46 – Close of window 6 business days following the close of the testing window March 11 June 10
After Close of Window 6 business days after receiving all scoring data for the testing window TBD TBD

* Day that the test results are received by the AICPA

“Day in Testing Window” refers to the date AICPA receives the test result, not the test date. Additionally, some candidates who take the BEC section might receive their scores approximately one week following the target release date due to additional analysis that might be required for the written communication tasks. Scores are generally released during regular business hours.

From NASBA website

Continuing Education for Tax Professionals

Credits must be obtained from IRS approved CE Providers.

Click here for List of Approved Continuing Education Providers

Continuing education requirements and the approval of CE providers for four categories of tax professionals:

  • Enrolled Agents
    • 72 hours every three years
      • Obtain a minimum of 16 hours per year (2 of which must be on ethics)
  • Enrolled Retirement Plan Agents
    • 72 hours every three years
      • Obtain a minimum of 16 hours per year (2 of which must be on ethics)
  • Registered Tax Return Preparers
    • 15 hours per year (beginning in calendar year 2012)
      • 2 hours of ethics
      • 3 hours of federal tax law updates
      • 10 hours of other federal tax law
  • Registered Tax Return Preparer candidates (provisional PTIN holders who have until 12/31/13 to become RTRPs)
    • 15 hours per year (beginning in calendar year 2012)
      • 2 hours of ethics
      • 3 hours of federal tax law updates
      • 10 hours of other federal tax law

 

2012 CPA Examination Score Release Timeline for Q1 and Q2 Testing Windows

CPA Examination Score Release Timeline for the January/February (Q1) and April/May (Q2) testing windows

Effective with the October/November 2011 testing window, scores will be reported with more predictability and frequency than the pre-CBT-e score release schedule. The timetable below is for the first half of 2012 to help candidates plan their testing schedule.

Scores for the Uniform CPA Exam will be released by NASBA to state boards of accountancy based upon the target score release dates listed in the table below. The timetable applies to candidates who have tested in both domestic and international testing locations.

Day in Testing Window* Target Release Date Timeline Target 12Q1 Score Release Target 12Q2 Score Release
Day 1 – 20 11 business days following day 20 of the testing window February 6 May 7
Day 21 – 45 6 business days following day 45 of the testing window February 22 May 23
Day 46 – Close of window 6 business days following the close of the testing window March 8 June 8
After Close of Window 6 business days after receiving all scoring data for the testing window TBD TBD

* Day that the test results are received by the AICPA

From NASBA website

2011 CPA Exam Score Release Timeline

Scoring timeline for 2011

From the fourth testing window  in 2011 will scores be released to NASBA following the first month of testing in a window, with subsequent score releases every two weeks for the remainder of the window.

After October 1, 2011 scores for the CPA Exam will be released by NASBA to state boards of accountancy based upon the table below.

Day in Testing Window* Target Release Date Timeline Target 11Q4 Score Release
Day 1 – 20 10 business days following
day 20 of the testing window
November 3
Day 21 – 45 5 business days following
day 45 of the testing window
November 21
Day 46 – Close of Window 5 business days following
the close of the testing window
December 7
After Close of Window 5 business days after receiving
all scoring data for the testing
window
TBA

Read more on AICPA website

CPA Exam Sample Tests

Click here for Uniform CPA Examination Sample Tests and Tutorial on AICPA website.

The sample tests provide  preview of the CPA Examination experience and is functional replica of real CPA Examination. The sample test software allows candidates to answer test questions that represent all of the question types  found on the CPA Examination: multiple choice, written communication, task-based simulation and also provide answers to sample questions.

Accountants and Auditors Wages

 

 

Top paying States

State Employment (1) Employment per thousand jobs Location quotient (9) Hourly mean wage Annual mean wage (2)
New York 91,630 10.98 1.30 $40.98 $85,230
District of Columbia 9,910 15.49 1.84 $40.57 $84,390
New Jersey 34,130 9.05 1.07 $38.28 $79,620
Maryland 22,240 9.03 1.07 $36.48 $75,870
Massachusetts 33,290 10.68 1.27 $36.07 $75,030

 

 

Top paying metropolitan areas

Metropolitan area Employment (1) Employment per thousand jobs Location quotient (9) Hourly mean wage Annual mean wage (2)
New York-White Plains-Wayne, NY-NJ Metropolitan Division 63,320 12.71 1.51 $42.90 $89,220
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA 9,440 11.01 1.31 $42.67 $88,750
Nassau-Suffolk, NY Metropolitan Division 12,500 10.39 1.23 $41.83 $87,000
Newark-Union, NJ-PA Metropolitan Division 9,300 9.76 1.16 $40.67 $84,600
San Francisco-San Mateo-Redwood City, CA Metropolitan Division 13,350 14.07 1.67 $40.67 $84,590
Haverhill-North Andover-Amesbury, MA-NH NECTA Division 380 4.98 0.59 $39.63 $82,420
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV Metropolitan Division 28,920 12.63 1.50 $39.60 $82,360
Bethesda-Frederick-Gaithersburg, MD Metropolitan Division 6,880 12.48 1.48 $38.87 $80,850
Oakland-Fremont-Hayward, CA Metropolitan Division 8,130 8.55 1.01 $38.54 $80,160
Edison-New Brunswick, NJ Metropolitan Division 8,340 8.67 1.03 $38.18 $79,420

 

Top paying nonmetropolitan areas

Nonmetropolitan area Employment (1) Employment per thousand jobs Location quotient (9) Hourly mean wage Annual mean wage (2)
East Central New York nonmetropolitan area 150 4.54 0.54 $39.60 $82,360
Southwest Massachusetts nonmetropolitan area 60 4.78 0.57 $38.62 $80,330
North Idaho nonmetropolitan area 90 1.87 0.22 $36.37 $75,660
North Central Colorado nonmetropolitan area 780 10.68 1.27 $36.14 $75,180
St. Mary’s County, Maryland nonmetropolitan area 190 4.69 0.56 $36.03 $74,940

 

 

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 2010

Accountants and Auditors – Occupational Outlook Handbook

Accountants and auditors help to ensure that firms are run efficiently, public records kept accurately, and taxes paid properly and on time. They analyze and communicate financial information for various entities such as companies, individual clients, and Federal, State, and local governments. Beyond carrying out the fundamental tasks of the occupation—providing information to clients by preparing, analyzing, and verifying financial documents—many accountants also offer budget analysis, financial and investment planning, information technology consulting, and limited legal services.

Specific job duties vary widely among the four major fields of accounting and auditing: public accounting, management accounting, government accounting, and internal auditing.

Public accountants perform a broad range of accounting, auditing, tax, and consulting activities for their clients, which may be corporations, governments, nonprofit organizations, or individuals. For example, some public accountants concentrate on tax matters, such as advising companies about the tax advantages and disadvantages of certain business decisions and preparing individual income tax returns. Others offer advice in areas such as compensation or employee healthcare benefits, the design of accounting and data processing systems, and the selection of controls to safeguard assets. Still others audit clients’ financial statements and inform investors and authorities that the statements have been correctly prepared and reported. These accountants are also referred to as external auditors. Public accountants, many of whom are Certified Public Accountants (CPAs), generally have their own businesses or work for public accounting firms.

Some public accountants specialize in forensic accounting—investigating and interpreting white-collar crimes such as securities fraud and embezzlement, bankruptcies and contract disputes, and other complex and possibly criminal financial transactions, including money laundering by organized criminals. Forensic accountants combine their knowledge of accounting and finance with law and investigative techniques to determine whether an activity is illegal. Many forensic accountants work closely with law enforcement personnel and lawyers during investigations and often appear as expert witnesses during trials.

Management accountants—also called cost, managerial, industrial, corporate, or private accountants—record and analyze the financial information of the companies for which they work. Among their other responsibilities are budgeting, performance evaluation, cost management, and asset management. Usually, management accountants are part of executive teams involved in strategic planning or the development of new products. They analyze and interpret the financial information that corporate executives need to make sound business decisions. They also prepare financial reports for other groups, including stockholders, creditors, regulatory agencies, and tax authorities. Within accounting departments, management accountants may work in various areas, including financial analysis, planning and budgeting, and cost accounting.

Government accountants and auditors work in the public sector, maintaining and examining the records of government agencies and auditing private businesses and individuals whose activities are subject to government regulations or taxation. Accountants employed by Federal, State, and local governments ensure that revenues are received and expenditures are made in accordance with laws and regulations. Those employed by the Federal Government may work as Internal Revenue Service agents or in financial management, financial institution examination, or budget analysis and administration.

Internal auditors verify the effectiveness of their organization’s internal controls and check for mismanagement, waste, or fraud. They examine and evaluate their firms’ financial and information systems, management procedures, and internal controls to ensure that records are accurate and controls are adequate. They also review company operations, evaluating their efficiency, effectiveness, and compliance with corporate policies and government regulations. Because computer systems commonly automate transactions and make information readily available, internal auditors may also help management evaluate the effectiveness of their controls based on real-time data, rather than personal observation. They may recommend and review controls for their organization’s computer systems, to ensure their reliability and integrity of the data. Internal auditors may also have specialty titles, such as information technology auditors, environmental auditors, and compliance auditors.

Read more

More information:

 

Information about careers in certified public accounting and CPA standards and examinations may be obtained from:

  • American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, 1211 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10036. Internet: http://www.aicpa.org
  • AICPA Examinations Team, Parkway Corporate Center, 1230 Parkway Ave., Suite 311, Ewing, NJ 08628-3018. Internet: http://www.cpa-exam.org

Information on CPA licensure requirements by State may be obtained from:

  • National Association of State Boards of Accountancy, 150 Fourth Ave. North, Suite 700, Nashville, TN 37219-2417. Internet: http://www.nasba.org

Information on careers in management accounting and the CMA designation may be obtained from:

  • Institute of Management Accountants, 10 Paragon Dr., Montvale, NJ 07645-1718. Internet: http://www.imanet.org

Information on careers in internal auditing and the CIA designation may be obtained from:

  • The Institute of Internal Auditors, 247 Maitland Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32701-4201. Internet: http://www.theiia.org

Information on careers in information systems auditing and the CISA designation may be obtained from: